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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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17 results for The Laurel of Asheville Vol. 13 Issue 3, March 2017
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29746
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In small Western North Carolina towns, some lesser-known yet high-ranking community colleges are changing lives for local students of all ages and backgrounds. Mayland Community College provides hundreds of workforce development and continuing education courses that serve Mitchell, Avery and Yancey counties. Western Piedmont Community College in Morganton is one of the only community colleges in the state with a sustainable agriculture program.
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29748
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In Western North Carolina, Hendersonville’s Balfour Education Center is a non-traditional high school that offers classes in business, criminal justice, firefighting, and mechatronics. The school’s Art Academy offers four levels of art instruction, and provides students with the opportunity to participate in community projects and art shows.
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29745
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Western North Carolina offers a variety of educational opportunities and training in a wide range special interests. This article highlights three of those opportunities which include training in massage therapy and restorative healing, commercial driving in the trucking industry, and learning ocean ecology at the new Team ECCO Ocean Center and Aquarium.
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29743
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Since reopening a modest storefront in downtown Asheville a year ago, Bryan Hudson has curated a remarkable collection of homegrown products. His business, Asheville Direct, is rooted in the local economy, selling locally made foods, medicines and skin care products. His shop has helped many businesses launch new products and expand their customer base.
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29742
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Megan Richard is a watermedia artist in Hendersonville, North Carolina. She creates nature paintings inspired by memories of her childhood and family, and the songbird is a repeated thematic element in her work. Richard primarily uses watercolors, but likes to use inks and fluid acrylics as well.
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29749
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The University of North Carolina Asheville recently opened the new STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Math) Studio. The building serves as a place of innovative collaboration for engineers and artists, and promotes integrated thinking.
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29744
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A series of workshops offered this spring and summer by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at the University of North Carolina, Asheville will highlight the crafts of the Appalachian Mountains. Some of these crafts include handmade brooms, corn shuck dolls, basketry and blown glass.
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29747
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The Asheville area is known as a farm-to-table mecca. Businesses such as The Farm, Franny’s Farm, Thyme in the Garden, and Villagers offer training and workshops in cooking, growing food, gardening and farming.
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29752
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Western North Carolina has a longstanding appreciation for traditional arts and crafts, and creative learning opportunities abound. The John C. Campbell Folk School offers a wide range of classes in blacksmithing, jewelry, music, woodworking, cooking and writing. Other schools provide workshops and training in marbling, arts entrepreneurship, pottery, and letterpress.
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29757
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The first century of European immigrant history in the Appalachian Mountains of North Carolina was without commercial tobacco, thus requiring no specialized barn. As settlement came to the area, farm families built barns to house their livestock. Now becoming more rare, these pre-tobacco livestock barns can be spotted by their log crib and steep gable roofs covered in tin.
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29753
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Dr. Jan Davidson is the former executive director of John C. Campbell Folk Art School in Brasstown, North Carolina, from which he also received his doctoral degree in Folklore, History and Museum Studies. In an interview, Davidson discusses his philosophy of education, accomplishments as the Folk School’s director, and the diversity of the school’s programs.
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29751
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For the last 30 years, Mountain Area Radio Reading Service (MARRS) has broadcasted a news radio program for blind and visually impaired people in Asheville and surround areas. The program is run by George deWalder, Jonathan Milam, and sixty volunteers who provide on-air readings of local newspapers and national publications.
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29750
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Some benefits of private or boarding schools are exceptional academics, small class sizes, and environment that fosters independence and camaraderie, and high rates of admission to elite universities. Among the most notable private and boarding schools in Western North Carolina are Asheville School, Arthur Morgan School, and Carolina Day School.
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29756
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Asheville Farm To Table Tours is a new form of agritourism operated by Ann D. Strauss. The tour takes visitors to various farms where they learn about farm life and mountain foodways. Some of the destinations include East Fork Farm, Spinning Spider Creamery, and The Farmer’s Hands.
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29754
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Cliff Mori runs brewery/history walking tours in downtown Asheville, also known as Beer City. His educational-based BREW-ED tour company takes visitors to local craft breweries and teaches them about various beer styles and flavors.
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