NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


8 results for John C. Campbell Folk Art School (Brasstown)
Currently viewing results 1 - 8
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
3571
Author(s):
Abstract:
Established in 1925, the John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown teaches classes, including weaving, photography, pottery, and wood carving, that allow individuals to learn a new skill or refine an existing one.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 1, Jan 1998, p40
Record #:
3804
Author(s):
Abstract:
The John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown and the Penland School of Crafts in Penland are schools where professional artists create and beginners can explore new skills for their own growth and enjoyment. Classes include weaving, pottery, and photography.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
5812
Author(s):
Abstract:
The John C. Campbell Folk School in Cherokee County's Brasstown, attracts yearly some 3,000 people, who study subjects from blacksmithing to writing. It also pumps $4 million into the economy. For this it received the 1997 Governor's Business Award in the Arts and Humanities.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 6, June 1998, p32-33
Record #:
6858
Author(s):
Abstract:
The John C. Campbell Folk School in Cherokee County's Brasstown, attracts yearly some 3,000 people, who study subjects from blacksmithing to writing. The school opened in 1925. The term folk school comes from the Danish language and means “a school for the people.” Thus, while folk traditions like pottery, weaving, and carving are studied there, people are also free to pursue non-folk interests, such as photography and genealogy, that help them to grow as creative people.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 3, Aug 2004, p96-98, 100-101, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
8566
Author(s):
Abstract:
The John C. Campbell Folk School in Brasstown is known primarily for its instruction in handcrafts, particularly wood-carving. Campbell went to college in Massachusetts and worked as a teacher in Alabama and Tennessee, and later served as president of Piedmont College in North Georgia. His work in rural Southern communities convinced him that schools were not preparing students to remain in their communities. While traveling through western North Carolina with his wife, Campbell heard about folk schools in Denmark and came to believe an adaptation of these schools would work well in the Southern mountains. Campbell died suddenly in 1919 but his wife continued his work, visiting the schools in Denmark and other European countries and locating a site on which to build his school. Brasstown was chosen and a merchant there, Fred O. Scroggs, gave ninety acres of land including a farmhouse which is still in use today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 5, Oct 1982, p11-13, il, por
Full Text:
Record #:
21407
Abstract:
Perry describes the beginnings and growth of the John C. Campbell Folk School which was founded in 1925 by Olive Dame Campbell and named in honor of her husband. Located in Brasstown in Cherokee County, the school offers classes including blacksmithing, pottery, weaving, dyeing, knitting, and dulcimer instruction to over 5,500 students yearly.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 7, Dec 2013, p140-163, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
23869
Author(s):
Abstract:
John C. Campbell Folk School invites students to learn craft making, folk songs, and dancing. Located past the crossroads at Brasstown, the Folk School was founded by Olive Dame Campbell to help a wider audience connect with the old ways.
Record #:
29753
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Jan Davidson is the former executive director of John C. Campbell Folk Art School in Brasstown, North Carolina, from which he also received his doctoral degree in Folklore, History and Museum Studies. In an interview, Davidson discusses his philosophy of education, accomplishments as the Folk School’s director, and the diversity of the school’s programs.