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7 results for Tar Heel Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980
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Record #:
6545
Abstract:
Smith recounts the excursion made by inventor Thomas Edison to North Carolina in 1906. By then he was famous for his inventions, which included the phonograph, light bulb, and motion picture projector. Edison traveled with two steam-powered automobiles and brought his son and two mechanics with him. He had just developed an alkaline storage battery for autos, and came to North Carolina seeking cobalt. The inventor felt that by using cobalt he could reduce the weight of the battery from 67 pounds to 46.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p21, 50, por
Record #:
6544
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bell recounts the history of the Carolina Cotillion Club June German. The club organized in 1885 in Rocky Mount. The german was a two-step dance with a leader who goes at the head of its intricate figures. The dance was the social event of the region and attracted thousands to the warehouse where it was held.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p16-17, 50, il
Record #:
6546
Author(s):
Abstract:
Willard Watson was born on Wildcat Road in the town of Deep Gap in Watauga County. He has lived all his life just a few miles from there. Watson discusses his life and times as a moonshiner.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p22-24, il, por
Record #:
35850
Author(s):
Abstract:
Deep River’s yields to NC citizens stretched back to pre-Colonial days. Its valued could be gauged in coal used by Confederate blockade runners and hardwoods like the White Pine. How the author attained an appreciation: by the great outdoors experiences of camping and canoeing.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p18-19, 52
Record #:
35848
Abstract:
Was quilting’s comeback because, as Faulker speculated, of the current energy crisis or colder winters? Whatever the cause, the author was appreciative for the revival of interest that had also resurged warm memories.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p8
Subject(s):
Record #:
35849
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of classic authors NC could claim as its own, only O. Henry and Thomas Wolfe the author offered. As for current ones, Owen offered a much longer list of native sons and daughters, many still residing in the Tar Heel State. Among them were Ann Tyler, Fred Chappell, and Doris Betts.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p9, 52
Record #:
35851
Author(s):
Abstract:
A mute peddler the author called “the vanilla man” offered a string of pearls with the purchase of his product. Its true value, she realized, was irrevocably lost with the string of pearls broken.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p26-27, 55