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8 results for Henry, O. (William Sydney Porter), 1862-1910
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Record #:
8330
Author(s):
Abstract:
In April 1985, Greensboro celebrated a week-long festival for the seventy-fifth anniversary of William Sydney Porter's death. Porter, known as O. Henry, was born in Greensboro September 11, 1862. His mother, Mary Virginia Jane Swaim, was the daughter of the Greensboro Patriot's editor. Swaim was influential in Porter's writing career because she encouraged his interest in literature. Porter left Greensboro for Texas in 1890. He was convicted of embezzlement and spent three years in the Ohio State Penitentiary. Porter finally settled in New York City, where he died in 1910. Festival activities in Greensboro included literary competitions, plays, concerts, and exhibits related to O. Henry's short stories.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p11-12, por
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Record #:
8329
Author(s):
Abstract:
O. Henry, as William Sydney Porter called himself, might have been recorded shortly before his death in 1910. Although some remember hearing him on a radio program celebrating Thomas Edison's birthday, no recording has been uncovered yet. Porter was known to have a pleasing voice, but was shy and reserved. He lived in New York City and spent his days wondering around, observing others. These observations created ideas for his short stories. Porter also wished to remain anonymous, hence his pen name.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p10, por
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Record #:
8584
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Sydney Porter, also known as O. Henry, grew up in Greensboro. It was there as a young child that he befriended John Thom, who was the grandfather of John Thom Spach, the author of this article. The friendship appeared years later in the character of John Tom, in O. Henry's story “The Atavism of John Tom Little Bear.” At age nineteen, Porter moved to Texas seeking a cure for his tuberculosis. There, Porter lived on the ranch of Dr. James K. Hall, another native North Carolinian who had moved to Texas. Hall's son, Lee Hall, was a famous lawman and a captain in the Texas Rangers. O. Henry based the characters Ranger Lieutenant Sandridge and Ranger Lieutenant Bob Buckley on Lee Hall. Porter never became a tough lawman like Hall and he left the ranch for Austin, Texas. In Austin, Porter worked in several different jobs, including a bank teller's job at the First National Bank of Austin, where Porter was later accused of embezzling bank funds. He was convicted of the charge and spent almost two years in prison.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 4, Sept 1983, p10-13, por
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Record #:
8739
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Sydney Porter, known as O. Henry, was born in Greensboro in 1862. Most of his stories were set in the south, and a recurrent theme in his tales was the old south versus the new south. Full of humor, satire, and stereotypes, several of O. Henry's stories are autobiographical and set in the Catskills. O. Henry died in 1910 and is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Asheville, not far from Thomas Wolfe.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 49 Issue 10, Mar 1982, p13, por
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Record #:
9257
Author(s):
Abstract:
Found in the collection of Count Alain de Suzannet of Switzerland, a series of drawings and writings of Greensboro native William Sydney Porter has recently been bought for the Greensboro Public Library. Porter, better known as O. Henry, drew political cartoons and several of these, along with part of a script to his play “Lo,” are included in the collection.\r\n
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 46 Issue 2, July 1978, p10-12, il, por
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Record #:
10205
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Abstract:
Rogers recounts the life of Greensboro native, William Sidney Porter, who wrote under the name of \"O. Henry\" and is considered one of the greatest American short story writers.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 6 Issue 12, Apr 1949, p18-21, 27, por, bibl
Record #:
20753
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pike clears up misconceptions, such as date of birth, original spelling of his name and location of the Porter home, about the life of Greensboro native, William Sidney Porter, who wrote under the name of \"O. Henry.\" Porter is considered one of the greatest American short story writers.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 12, Aug 1946, p9, 23
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Record #:
35849
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of classic authors NC could claim as its own, only O. Henry and Thomas Wolfe the author offered. As for current ones, Owen offered a much longer list of native sons and daughters, many still residing in the Tar Heel State. Among them were Ann Tyler, Fred Chappell, and Doris Betts.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p9, 52