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17 results for Distilling, Illicit
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Record #:
4532
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Arthur R. Currin, retied deputy sheriff of Granville County, fought against moonshiners for over thirty years. Currin recounts some of his experiences in catching moonshiners and destroying stills. In one story he recounts how, as a teenager, he helped his father, also a deputy sheriff, track moonshiners.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 32 Issue 4, Apr 2000, p17-22, il Periodical Website
Record #:
5371
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Quality, quantity, and distribution of the product are the foundations of successful businesses, including the state's oldest business - moonshining. Current estimates place the number of operating stills in North Carolina between 20 and 30. Martin discusses the development of moonshining in the state and its status today.
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Record #:
6546
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Willard Watson was born on Wildcat Road in the town of Deep Gap in Watauga County. He has lived all his life just a few miles from there. Watson discusses his life and times as a moonshiner.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 3, Apr 1980, p22-24, il, por
Record #:
8165
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Following World War II, many North Carolinians wanted a drink of liquor. Many counties, however, enforced dry laws. The need for alcoholic beverages gave rise to the tradition of the mountain moonshiners. The most exciting aspect of the moonshining business was transporting the liquor. Haulers devised new ways to avoid the police. One way was to reinforce a car's rear springs. This kept the car level when hauling a heavy load. When a car was not loaded, the rear springs lifted the car's rear, giving away a hauler's identity. Contrary to popular belief, confrontations between police and moonshiners were usually nonviolent. As counties repealed their dry laws, the demand for illegal alcohol decreased, but the moonshine industry left a legacy of fast cars and high speeds.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 5, Oct 1984, p17, 39
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Record #:
8937
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In 1959 Arnold Krochmal was a new park ranger in the Great Smokey Mountain National Park. It was rumored that moonshiners were active in the park. Another ranger rented a plane and found nine stills making moonshine within the park boundaries. Krochmal and his fellow rangers hiked through the forest and found one of the stills. They also spotted two men carrying burlap sacks over their shoulders. The two men fled into the woods. The rangers made no arrest but took the sacks as evidence of moonshining activity.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 9, Feb 1984, p22-23, por
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Record #:
12202
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North Carolina leads the nation in the multimillion-dollar business of illegal alcohol production. Accounting for one fourth of the property and illegal whiskey seized by the United States Government in 1956, proceeds from North Carolina's infractions totaled some $795,776 dollars, and included 3,507 stills, 43,485 gallons of whiskey, and 2,059,023 gallons of mash.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 8, Sept 1957, p20, il
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Record #:
13211
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Containing photos and describing the equipment and process of distilling, the author offers an inside glimpse into the illegal manufacturing of moonshine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 12, Nov 1954, p13, 21, il
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Record #:
13716
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In the late 19th century, Buffalo City in Dare County was a thriving logging town, but by the 1920s the area's useful timber was about depleted. That was when the town was revived by a new industry -- moonshine whiskey.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 10, Mar 2011, p36-38, 40, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
13743
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Robeson citizens say that their Sheriff Malcolm G. McLeod has set an all-time record for destruction of bootleg liquor stills in only his first year.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 39, Feb 1952, p3, 19, f
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Record #:
14064
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Local law enforcement raided a still in the woods near Rowland, Robeson County. An officer was shot by one of the moonshiners, which halted the raid in favor of getting the man to a hospital. The story took a bizarre twist when law enforcement officers returned to the scene the next morning to find the moonshiner had not fled but was instead sitting on a log dead, having been shot in the head. Investigations revealed the moonshiner's rifle shot triggered the officer's revolver despite the deputy never pulling the trigger; an uncanny story later aired on the radio show \"Ripley's Believe-It-Or-Not.\"
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p15, il
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Record #:
14175
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Among the various industries in North Carolina are some more illicit trades, such as moonshining.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 35, Jan 1950, p4-5, f
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Record #:
14230
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This article is a brief story about a moonshining raid in Transylvania County. In this instance, moonshiners hid their illicit substance underground. A large cave was used to hide the still and accessed through a 221-foot long tunnel. The still was ingeniously hidden in plain sight, not more than \"200 yards of a well-traveled road, within 3 miles of a populous town, and within a maintained cornfield.\"
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 13, Aug 1948, p10, il
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Record #:
14924
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In 1943, the production and sale of homemade corn liquor increased greatly compared to neighboring states. Agents for the Alcohol Tax Unit and Bureau of Internal Revenue cited the following causes: \"1. The High tax on legal whiskey with attendant high retail price. 2. The growing scarcity of legal fire-water. 3. The attractive prices illegal stuff is bringing-$17 a gallon and up.\" Bootleggers used granulated sugar mash, molasses, corn meal, and syrup to brew their illegal potion.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 34, Jan 1944, p1, 26, il
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Record #:
16983
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There is nothing nebulous about moonshine laws. North Carolina laws forbid the manufacture or possession of moonshine, or non-tax-paid spirituous liquor.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 28, July 2012, p22 Periodical Website
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Record #:
16984
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In 1958, THE SATURDAY EVENING POST introduced the nation to Percy Flowers, for years, North Carolina's number one bootlegger of Wilders Townships, Johnston County. At the time of the POST profile, it was estimated the Flowers was earning $1 million a year in untaxed revenue from the sale of white liquor.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 29 Issue 28, July 2012, p23, f Periodical Website
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