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10 results for Tar Heel Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980
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Record #:
6543
Abstract:
Parramore describes a way of life that lasted for over one hundred years on the Albemarle Sound and its tributaries, the use of great sweep-seines to harvest runs of shad, herring, and other fish. He discusses the work and skill of the workers who manned the seines, which could often stretch up to two miles. The work period was short, lasting from around eight weeks in the early spring, when the fish swarmed the waters in uncountable numbers. By the beginning of World War II, use of the great seines on the Albemarle waters was over; they were victims of smaller and more efficient equipment.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p41-43, il
Record #:
6542
Author(s):
Abstract:
While many of his fans remember that author F. Scott Fitzgerald's wife Zelda died in a fire in Asheville, few know that he spent time in North Carolina between 1935 and 1937. He had come to the state hoping to improve his finances and revive his writing career. Neither happened.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p36-37, por
Record #:
35837
Abstract:
Crowder’s Mountain, west of Gastonia, had become a well-known site for outdoor recreation, courtesy of its recently opened park. Contributing to the area’s burst of popularity was a host of recreational activities: camping and hiking, climbing and picnics, fishing and rowing.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p18-19
Record #:
35847
Author(s):
Abstract:
The football in question was the American sort, a game with great support among young sport enthusiasts. Soccer’s popularity in cities like Charlotte was explained by reasons such as having less competitive pressure than sports like football and separation of the sexes on the field.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p38-39
Record #:
35843
Author(s):
Abstract:
Solar power was a commonly perceived power source of the future. The author proved it was an energy source of the ages—harnessed as far back as antiquity, in fact. To prove it a feasible solution for the current energy crisis, he discussed the facility of active and passive solar power. He also proposed how homes could be retrofitted, or equipped, to generate this type of power.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p23-26, 55-56, 58
Record #:
35844
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mules have a longtime reputation among farmers as strong and stubborn. Add to this homing, or the ability to find their way to the homestead. As for how hybrid beasts like Belle was able to, explanations were offered such as backtracking, sniffing out their own tracks, and night eyes, what the author described as “horn like patches” on their inner forelegs, slightly above the knees.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p28-29
Record #:
35846
Author(s):
Abstract:
Featured was the Chairman of the Raleigh based Congressional Club and newly formed Coalition for Freedom. Ellis discussed his reasons for switching to the GOP. He also expounded on a belief in a revival of Republican support across NC. Among evidence offered was the election of its first Republican senator in the century, Jesse Helms, an election in which Ellis played a pivotal role.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p33-34, 47-48, 50
Record #:
35838
Abstract:
The author proposed that the ability to see involved the perception of seeing as much as the parts of the eye functioning. Asserting his claim was a patient of his, Melissa Pierce, who gained the ability see because of a program Dr. Murrell proposed would provide the cure: Living and Learning in a Visual Environment (LIVE). Included were the four foci for the program that may prove the adage “seeing is believing” should be expressed as “believing is seeing.”
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p20-21
Record #:
35836
Abstract:
Faulkner noted cave walls as a site of a form of communication not regarded so often as such: graffiti. As for a modern day equivalent of cave walls, Faulkner noted school desktops as a site for what may also be seen as a combination of written communication and artistic expression.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p8
Record #:
35845
Author(s):
Abstract:
For recreation, rest, and resort like residency, the author proposed resorting to Wolf Laurel, Foxfire, and Bald Island. The mountains’ Wolf Laurel offered horseback riding and hiking. For golfers, the Highlands’ Foxfire offered outings galore on the green. Bald Island offered lovers of the great outdoors acreage of palm trees and evidence (at least tracks) of wildlife like cougars.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Mar 1980, p31-32, 46