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8 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 59 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2012
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Record #:
36889
Abstract:
Visiting several cemeteries in Jackson County’s Canada Township, the author happened across a cemetery style that he had not seen before, found in three different cemeteries. The style was a bare earth mound, meaning the graves were mounded up and kept clear of grass and weeds, and then covered with a thick layer of white gravel to maintain the shape and suppress growth of grass.
Record #:
36888
Abstract:
Based on their shared belief that quilt making is one of the most widely known and personally experienced crafts for many North Carolinians, more than 20 men and women aged 14 to 82 have the mission to support, encourage, and document quilting traditions and activities as a part of the Heritage Quilters group.
Record #:
36890
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Abstract:
Drawn from the oral culture of the southern mountains, a catalogue of folklore creatures with a description and some illustrations comprises most of this article.
Record #:
36887
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clogging in North Carolina originated in the western counties, but grew as college students took it up from seeing it at folk festivals. The Green Grass Cloggers were comprised of ECU students who won over audiences with their casual dress and spirited way of dancing.
Record #:
36886
Author(s):
Abstract:
Simpson began making use of cast off materials during his time in WWII, and continued the pattern when he returned home. When he retired, he began making windmills and whirligigs and placed them around a pond on his family land.
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Record #:
36881
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Abstract:
Carmine Prioli’s initial interest in boatbuilding evolved into years of caring, working, believing, struggling, hoping, giving, sometimes pushing hard, for the people who build, work, and appreciate not only those boats, but all the pieces of heritage on Harkers Island.
Record #:
36876
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wanting to move to a small town, the Albrights bought a building and turned it into a general store and eventually also turned it into a music hall.
Record #:
36878
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bill Myers is an artist and interpreter of African American music traditions in his community and region.