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177 results for "Sea Chest"
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Record #:
29984
Abstract:
The hurricane of 1944 hit Avon, North Carolina with a vengeance, washing away stores, homes, and other structures from their foundations. The short lived hurricane pushed back the sound waters with high tides, causing flooding to bust through dunes and ruin freshwater cisterns.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p18-19, por
Record #:
29982
Abstract:
Built to commemorate the 400th anniversary of the first English settlers in America, the Elizabeth II is now ready to sail. The replica 16th century merchant vessel, maintained by the State of North Carolina, will sit afloat at Manteo.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p4-7, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29983
Abstract:
When the hurricane of 1933 came to Hatteras, the residents were battened down. Although houses were washed out and trees broken down, the villagers on the Island continued to stay put.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p10-11, por
Record #:
29985
Author(s):
Abstract:
When a hurricane hit Avon, North Carolina on September 14, 1944, residents of the Outer Banks were used to bygone years of inundation and erosion, and early morning preparation were being made to move furniture and goods. But the hurricane reached 150 miles an hour, rushing the ocean tides into the Pamlico Sound, cutting the dunes, and ripping possessions and homes from their owners.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p20-29, por
Record #:
29986
Abstract:
In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt established the Civilian Conservation Corp as part of the New Deal Program. In a mission to help stabilize the shoreline, many men from the southern region of the United States came to the Outer Banks to erect sand fences, create sand dunes, and plant sea oats and grass.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p40-42, por
Record #:
29987
Abstract:
In the 1920s, when the Great Depression hit the United States, people on the Outer Banks fared a bit better than most. Gardens and proximity to ocean and sound resources helped communities like Buxton and Hatteras, persevere.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p43, por
Record #:
36025
Abstract:
Clarence Jennette’s memories recalled were of the area’s well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. The Hatteras residents’ method of battening down the hatches and waiting it out—has proven to help them weather any storm.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p8-9
Record #:
36029
Author(s):
Abstract:
Glimpses of the past were perhaps seen most clearly in this collection of photos. One was a reminder of when the ferry was the only source of transport for humans and cargo. Others were reminders of businesses long since gone out of business, as well as buildings still standing. Most the photos, though, attested the importance of waterways around the Island, whether the creek familiarly known as the “Slash,” Core Sound, or Atlantic Ocean.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p30-39
Record #:
36026
Abstract:
This article, part of a series for this edition, recounted Hatteras Island’s experience with the well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. What it has in common with “Storm Memories” was personal accounts, in this case of a family, the Austins, rather than an individual, Clarence Jennette.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p12-13
Record #:
36028
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article, part of a series for this edition, chronicled Hatteras Island’s encounters with well-known 1933 and 1944 hurricanes. This recollection by Ernal Foster, included photos illustrating the 1933 storm’s impact, proved pictures can be worth a thousand words.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p15-17
Record #:
36027
Abstract:
A resident of this town, renamed Frisco since Maggie Austin’s experience with the 1944 hurricane, recalled its terrifying impact. What hadn’t changed: the resilience residents exhibited.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1985, p14
Record #:
29966
Abstract:
Thought to be the oldest ponies in North America, the horses on the Outer Banks may have come from Spanish settlers and English traders. There are three major herds left to see on Shackleford Banks, Currituck, and Hatteras.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, 1982, p8-10, por
Record #:
29968
Abstract:
Waterfowl need nesting habitat to reproduce, resting and feeding area, and wintering range. To assure this happens and the populations remain substantial, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service use a computer system to develop the bird banding program. Each year a percentage of is determined for the daily bag limit for hunters, ensuring that species have years in which the populations can rebuilt.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, 1982, p22-25, por, map
Subject(s):
Record #:
29974
Author(s):
Abstract:
After moving to Hatteras, North Carolina, Mike Perrotty has found that red drum fishing on the Outer Banks is the best sense of thrill and accomplishment.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, 1982, p26-29, por
Record #:
29981
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before 1960, fires on the Hatteras Island were attended to by concerned villagers who would save what they could. But the people realized that there needed to be something else they could do. With the help of some regional fire chiefs and money raised by the community, a fire house and engine were finally on the Island. Now the fire department consists of 50-60 well-trained fire fighters and five pieces of fire fighting apparatus from the villages of Buxton, Frisco, and Hatteras.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p54-58, por