NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Waterfowl management
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
26385
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fifty years ago, Congress enacted the Migratory Bird Conservation Act, authorizing a commission to study areas and acquire land and water as refuge for waterfowl.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 2, Spring 1979, p4-5, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26603
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina wildlife officers charged more than 400 persons this year with waterfowl-related violations. Record-low duck populations have caused state wildlife agencies to concentrate more enforcement efforts on baiting.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 3, May/June 1988, p11
Subject(s):
Record #:
6042
Author(s):
Abstract:
When publishing magnate and sportsman Joseph P. Knapp first came to Currituck in 1916, he began a love affair with the region. Earley describes how Knapp's love of hunting evolved into a need to conserve waterfowl. He helped form an organization which eventually became Ducks Unlimited, a leading conservation group. Since its founding in 1937, Ducks Unlimited has raised $134 million for waterfowl conservation. Almost $100 million has gone directly to wetland development.
Full Text:
Record #:
2927
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1983, the General Assembly passed a law to fund waterfowl habitat preservation by asking waterfowl hunters to purchase a specially painted state duck stamp. The stamp and limited edition art prints have raised over $3 million for the program.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
21089
Author(s):
Abstract:
In August 2013, the NC Wildlife Resources Commission received an award from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Southeast Region, for outstanding work in waterfowl conservation and management in the Southeast.
Full Text:
Record #:
29968
Abstract:
Waterfowl need nesting habitat to reproduce, resting and feeding area, and wintering range. To assure this happens and the populations remain substantial, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service use a computer system to develop the bird banding program. Each year a percentage of is determined for the daily bag limit for hunters, ensuring that species have years in which the populations can rebuilt.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, 1982, p22-25, por, map
Subject(s):