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156 results for "Journal of the New Bern Historical Society"
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Record #:
3781
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House researchers seek to know who owned property and when. The Harvey Mansion, built in the 1790s, and its surrounding property, have been sold a number of times. As of 1997, the house was functioning as a restaurant.
Record #:
3780
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John Taylor was a self-made man. From humble beginnings and little formal education, he built an insurance agency and ran it 55 years. He was instrumental in reorganizing the New Bern Historical Society in 1952 and served as its president for ten years.
Record #:
3779
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The New Bern Historical Society is observing its seventy-fifth anniversary in 1998. Among those citizens instrumental in its founding were Mrs. Minnette Chapman Duffy and Miss Gertrude Carraway.
Source:
Journal of the New Bern Historical Society (NoCar F 264 N5 J66), Vol. 11 Issue 1, May 1998, p3-40, il, por, bibl
Record #:
4067
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The First Baptist Missionary Church organized in 1869 as Cedar Grove Baptist Church, then called First Baptist Church, and finally First Baptist Missionary Church in the 1980s, the church had several sites before building on its present one in 1906. It has had strong pastors through the years and a dedicated congregation. Currently the church is in need of renovation, and the members meet in a sister white Baptist church. In 1998, the 1906 building was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
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Record #:
4066
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Taxation was a fact of life for the colonists as early as the 1600s. The main tax was the poll, or capitation, tax. However, as specific needs arose, taxes were levied for them. For example, in 1714-15, a tax paid for the Tuscarora War, and forts were built at Cape fear and Ocracoke with a eight-year tax levied in 1748.
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Record #:
4068
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John Lawson, surveyor and explorer of North Carolina, had close ties with New Bern and its founder, Baron von Graffenried. He guided the first settlers to the city's site and later assisted the baron in laying out the city and negotiating with the Indians. Lawson was killed by Indians soon after. In New Bern today, a creek, park, street, and bridge bear his name.
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Record #:
4221
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Born in 1852, F. L. Castex, Sr., was thirteen years old when the Civil War ended. In 1932, he recorded his recollections of the war in and around Goldsboro, including seeing refugee trains passing through, being close to cannon fire, seeing General Sherman, and peddling cakes his mother made to raise money.
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Record #:
4220
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Over the years a number of New Bern women have had an impact on the town, state, and nation. Emeline Pigott spied for the South during the Union occupation. Bayard Wootten became one of the 20th-century's most outstanding photographers. Charlotte Rhone was the state's first black registered nurse. Minnette Chapman Duffy organized the New Bern Historical Society in 1923.
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Record #:
4224
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Born in New Bern in 1875, Bayard Wootten is one of the state's most famous photographers. Her early life was difficult, both financially and personally. Her marriage failed, and needing money, she undertook many artistic ventures, including portraiture. One project was designing a new trademark for a new drink, Pepsi-Cola. Her best work was done in the 1930s and 1940s with photographs of the Great Depression and the people of Appalachia. Wootten is the subject of a 1998 book, LIGHT AND AIR, THE PHOTOGRAPHY OF BAYARD WOOTTEN.
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Record #:
4436
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In the early days of World War II, residents of the Outer Banks' communities, including Harkers Island and villagers on Hatteras and Ocracoke islands, saw the war up close and personal, as German submarines sank Allied ships within sight of the mainland. Cheatham recounts incidents from the dark days of 1942, when German U-Boats ruled the seas off North Carolina.
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Record #:
4437
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The New Bern Preservation Foundation organized in 1972 with the purpose of saving endangered historic buildings. Howlett summarizes the Foundation's preservation projects, the growth and changes in the Foundation, and current preservation projects.
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Record #:
4438
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For those interested in tracing the history of their houses, Ruckart provides a step-by-step process. While the author uses examples from New Bern, the process is applicable in any county.
Record #:
5789
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Union Station was completed in New Bern in 1910, during the period when railroads were the dominant mover of people and goods in the country. The authors discuss railroads in the early 20th-century, the struggle to get and build a railroad station in New Bern, and the current status of the building.
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Record #:
5813
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One of the first independent African American churches in New Bern was present-day Ebenezer Presbyterian Church, which was organized on November 24, 1878. Brigham discusses the history of the church.
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Record #:
8077
Abstract:
During the War of 1812, 1,607 British vessels were captured. Of this number, ninety-six were brought to nine North Carolina ports. Wilmington had the most with thirty-six, followed by Portsmouth and Beaufort. Otway Burns, captain of the SNAP DRAGON, brought in forty-two vessels and over 300 English prisoners. These ships and their cargoes were valued at more than $4 million. Blades lists each captured ship, who captured it, and the North Carolina port where it was taken.
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