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26 results for North Carolina--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Personal narratives
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Record #:
4221
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Born in 1852, F. L. Castex, Sr., was thirteen years old when the Civil War ended. In 1932, he recorded his recollections of the war in and around Goldsboro, including seeing refugee trains passing through, being close to cannon fire, seeing General Sherman, and peddling cakes his mother made to raise money.
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Record #:
7106
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Jacob Edwin Keiger left his parent's Stokes County farm and enlisted as a private in Company D of the 53rd North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War. Within three years dozens of Company D's 120 men were wounded, over forty were captured and held as prisoners, twenty-one deserted, and thirty-five died, mostly from disease. Keiger and his parents exchanged over one hundred letters before his death, at 24, in Raleigh from disease in July 1863. Excerpts his letters, interspersed with narrative of the company's movements, create a picture of one soldier's life during the Civil War.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p74-76, 78, 80, 82-83, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8784
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This is the second half of Lieutenant George C. Rounds' first-hand account of being in Raleigh in 1865. This part recounts the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, and the end of the war. Rounds sent a message from the top of the Capitol builging announcing the end of the war. The message read P-E-A-C-E.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 2, July 1980, p26-28, il
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Record #:
10666
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Lewis, a surgeon with the 3rd Georgia Regiment, Confederate States of America, recounts a strange incident that took place in a battle between Northern and Southern soldiers near South Mills in Camden County. The original of Dr. Lewis's account is in the Confederate Museum in Richmond, Virginia.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 1, June 1969, p10-13, il
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Record #:
19561
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Born and raised in New York, John Newland Maffitt began a long and storied naval career with a midshipman's commission in the United States Navy in 1832. Later he servds aboard the USS Constitution and was ordered to the United States Coast Survey to chart the southern harbors of Savannah, Charleston, and Wilmington. As a transplant to the South, Maffitt takes up the illicit activity of razing Union vessels during the Civil War and an account of his escapades and prizes won are outlined in this article.
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Record #:
20188
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This collection of letters of Ruffin Barnes of Wilson County, North Carolina throws light on the movement of Company C, Forty-Third North Carolina Infantry Regiment during the American Civil War.
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Record #:
20220
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Stephen Chaulker Bartlett was the acting surgeon onboard the U.S.S. LENAPPE. Letters written by Bartlett from the LENAPEE, one of the principal vessel in the attack on Wilmington, January-February 1865, give a glimpse of the ordinary living conditions in the lower Cape Fear in 1865, contraband, refugees, and a new era in North Carolina and US history.
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Record #:
20350
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After torpedoes plowed through Mobile Bay in 1864, the North and South became riveted on the last remaining port open to the Confederacy in Wilmington. In an attempt to smash Fort Fisher, guardian of the Cape Fear River approach to Wilmington, Rear Adm. David D. Porter was recalled from the interior to the Atlantic coast to lead the U.S. Navy in land-sea assaults on this last stronghold, and lead the final significant naval action of the American Civil War. This article displays the letters of Porter, as he discusses the preparation of attacks on Fort Fisher, the importance of Wilmington, supply problems, and administrative confusion.
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Record #:
20466
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Published accounts of prison life during the Civil War are often written long after the close of hostilities, making the accusations hard to accept without reservation. But one account, written by Francis Atherton Boyle from Plymouth during his imprisonment at Fort Delaware provides a look at how prisoners dealt with hardship of imprisonment.
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Record #:
20660
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This is the first of a two-part article detailing the military experiences of Union soldier and Bethlehem, PA native James A. Peifer drawn primarily from the author's analysis of a collection of letters written by Peifer to his sister Mary. Excerpts from the letters are included.
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Record #:
20680
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This is the conclusion of a two-part article detailing the military experiences of Union soldier and Bethlehem, PA native James A. Peifer drawn primarily from the author's analysis of a collection of letters written by Peifer to his sister Mary. Excerpts from the letters are included.
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Record #:
20693
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This is a reprint of Civil War letters written by Moravian volunteer soldier and Salem native, Henry W. Barrow. Letters, written from various camps in 1861, 1864 and 1865, give intimate glimpses of personal experiences during the war.
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Record #:
20811
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This is a reprint of letters written by Union Sargent Edward Nicholas Boots, 101st Pennsylvania Regiment, while posted in New Bern and Plymouth, North Carolina as well as one letter from prison at Andersonville, Georgia in 1863 and 1864. The author's introduction provides biographical information on Boots, as well as details of his war and combat experience and on his imprisonment and eventual death at Andersonville.
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Record #:
20876
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This is a reprint of letters written by seventeen year old Union Navy surgeon's steward Sayers Odgen Nichols while serving aboard the 8-gun side-wheeler USS MIAMI stationed as part of the Civil War blockading squadron off of Plymouth, NC. The letters were written between April 17, 1864 and May 6th, 1864 and describe his experiences aboard ship during that time including interaction with the confederate ram CSS ALBEMARLE. Some additional biographical information on Nichols is included in the introduction.
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Record #:
20995
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This is a reprint of entries from the diary of Lt. James W. Chapin, Adjutant of the Eighth Indiana Cavalry Regiment. Chapin wrote it while riding with Gen. Hugh Judson Kilpatrick's cavalry on the left wing of Gen. William T. Sherman's army during the Carolinas Campaign. The entries provide an account of Chapin's experiences during Sherman's march through the Carolinas as well as details and key witness testimony about allegations concerning the shooting of Union prisoners by Confederate Gen. Joseph Wheeler's men.
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