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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Plants
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Record #:
2014
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North Carolina's swamps, meadows, and woodlands are home to a large number of native plants, such as bee-balm and devil's walking stick, that stand out because of their colors, shapes, and leaf structures.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 11, Apr 1994, p16-17, il
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Record #:
4174
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Nonnative plants and animals are gaining a foothold in the state and threaten the environment. Some were purposefully introduced, while others arrived on their own. For example, purple loosestrife was introduced as an ornamental in the 1800s. In wetlands, though, loosestrife crowds out other plants and can affect nearby duck populations because its seeds are not a good food source. While some nonnative plants are good, such as corn and soybeans, others can, without their normal pests and climate limitations, grow out of control.
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Record #:
11314
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North Carolina's diverse vegetation and ecosystem are an important part of the state's appeal. Springtime marks the beginning of growth for the state as the Juneberry and Shadbush blossom. Native plants and trees such as the Dogwoods, Redbuds, and other fauna grow abundantly throughout the state. These numerous plants are an attractive element of North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 20, Mar 1966, p8-9, 38, il
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Record #:
16364
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The \"palmer Christian\" or Palma Christi is a palm tree of sorts that happens to grow unexpectedly in Bladen County, North Carolina. The Palma Christi was thought to be a charm against witchcraft and parts of its root could be used to promote quick and easy childbirth.
Record #:
26153
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Jeff Dangl, professor of biology, is trying to determine how plants fight off fungi and other invaders. He wants to find out what genes control the process, what chemicals signal those genes to set it off and to stop it.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 14 Issue 2, Winter 1998, p16-18, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
26799
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Chemists have demonstrated that a group of compounds called phyto-estrogens, found in a number of common plant species, produce in some animals the same infertile effects that the birth control pill produces in women. This discovery raises questions regarding the rate of plant extinction and implications for both humans and wildlife.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p11
Record #:
29915
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Slow Food Asheville picked the Cherokee Purple heirloom tomato to spotlight for its 2017 Heritage Food Project. In 1990, Craig LeHoullier of Raleigh, North Carolina, obtained and grew a packet of unnamed seeds that had been shared by the Cherokee Indians more than one-hundred years before. The tomato is purple in color and has gained a widespread fame amongst heirloom tomatoes.
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Record #:
30060
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Spider mites and false spider mites can cause considerable damage to plants. This report summarizes records for species of spider mites and false spider mites in North Carolina, as well as their plant hosts. Information is also provided on additional species that might be found in the state when more extensive collecting is done.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 12, Sept 1986, p19-27, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
30619
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The Japanese painted fern is a dependable perennial plant that can grow well in North Carolina summers and survive winter conditions. The plant is rated for USDA Zones three through eight, is deer-resistant, and prefers partial to fully shaded spots. This article provides tips on growing the fern in gardens.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Mar 2016, p13, il
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Record #:
35216
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For the author, his perception of eggplants as “weird” hasn’t changed—just the way he defined this descriptor. How weird transformed from bad to good: recognizing that their appearance varies, in terms of size and color, from type to type; their gardening quirks, both challenging and rewarding, are worth dealing with.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 49 Issue 3, Mar 2017, p26-27
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Record #:
35681
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Shrubs that can make a lovely addition to a landscape included Pyracantha and Holly, according to the author. How they can be useful to creatures of the two or many legged kind include becoming a border for a walkway or food for birds. Factors to consider for making them a valuable part of the landscape: types of fertilizer, pruning times, optimal planting depths, and common shrub problems.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 4, July/Aug 1978, p31-33
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Record #:
35810
Abstract:
The authors asserted them as a healthy and free supplement to the modern American diet: wild plants. To assure the collection is healthy were books such as Walter Muenscher’s Poisonous Plants of the United States and A Guide to Medicinal Plants of the United States. Helping to concoct a recipe for success were plants that could be eaten raw (dandelions and onions), ones that must be cooked (burdock roots and milkweed), and dishes such as dandelion salad.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p48-49
Record #:
35543
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A short blurb about not planting during the days of the star sign Cancer.
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Record #:
36156
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This collection of the top ten photos included categories such as ages of the photographers, plants, landscapes, outdoor recreation, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, invertebrates, and animal behavior. Nearly all of the winners came from towns in North Carolina’s three regions.
Record #:
36193
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Abstract:
The cover alluded to is mulch, produced naturally to promote wild plant growth. Materials recommended for creating mulch are wood bark/chips, leaves, and straw or hay. Additional incentive to use mulch in gardens were the downside of not having mulch as a natural protectant for plants.
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