NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


41 results for Photographers
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
29579
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eudora Welty photographed daily life in the South before she became a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer. Through September 3, the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh will display eighteen of Welty’s early photos in its new exhibition, Looking South. The photographs feature portraits of farmers, churchgoers, porch sitters, and sharecroppers.
Full Text:
Record #:
36989
Abstract:
A pioneering female photographer, with a body of work including 600,000 photographs, also left behind the clapboard house where her career began. Among the accomplishments her historic house became the site of was designing the first Pepsi-Cola logo for the pharmacist who invented the beverage.
Record #:
24857
Author(s):
Abstract:
Doward Jones Jr. finds inspirations for his photography from a variety of sources from books to the office window at his family’s business. Among his latest images are a series depicting the changing of the seasons in the tree lined wetlands along the Roanoke River in downtown Plymouth.
Record #:
29712
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Mountain Gateway Museum in Old Fort, North Carolina has a new exhibit titled, Appalachia a Century Ago, Craft Through the Lens of William A. Barnhill. The exhibit showcases the work of photographer William Barnhill, who captured the process of making baskets from the bark of young poplar trees in the early twentieth century.
Full Text:
Record #:
19311
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Latino population in the state is expanding. Jose Galvez, a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, captures snapshots of their culture. Most of his work has been done in the Southwest, focusing on Mexican-American life and culture. Around 2004 his focus changed to examine the diverse and emerging Latino population in North Carolina.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
19470
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sean Ruttkay's photography is life-size and captures those rare moments such as being in the pipe of a breaking wave or the instant a sea turtle breaks the surface to breathe. His photographs range from 2 feet by 3 feet to 8 feet by 12 feet. His pieces are shot in close proximity, usually within 12 inches. Since graduating from UNC-Wilmington he has sold over 1,000 pieces of his work.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p28, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
21394
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the first year that the photography competition was open to subscribers only, and it reduced the number of entries from previous years. There were ten categories--birds; mammals; reptiles and amphibians; invertebrates; wild plants; outdoor recreation; wild landscapes; animal behavior; youth photographers 13-17; youth photographers 12 and under--plus the grand prize.  There were 1,611 images entered and judged by Mike Dunn of the NC Museum of Natural Sciences and three from NC Wildlife Magazine--Marsh Tillett, art director, Alyssa Stephen, graphic designer; and Melissa McGaw, magazine photographer.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
21395
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the second year that the photography competition was open to subscribers (for adults, and there were 1,235 submissions in the following categories--birds; mammals; reptiles and amphibians; invertebrates; wild plants; outdoor recreation; wild landscapes; animal behavior; youth photographers 13-17; youth photographers 12 and under--plus the grand prize. Judges were Mike Dunn NC Museum of Natural Sciences and four from NC Wildlife Magazine--Marsh Tillett, art director, Katie Parland and Bryant Cole, graphic designers; and Melissa McGaw, magazine photographer.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
22422
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tim Barnwell grew up in rural Madison County. For the past thirty years he has been documenting a vanishing way of life on remote mountain farm in the Southern Appalachians. Much of his work is in black-and-white photography, which is portrayed in this photographic essay on mountain people. He has authored four books on this area.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
23776
Abstract:
In the early 1900s, George Masa (1881-1933) braved the wild to photograph the pristine Appalachian Mountains. As a result of his actions, much of the mountains have been protected for generations to come.
Source:
WNC Magazine (NoCar F261 .W64), Vol. 3 Issue 5, July 2009, p44-51, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
10132
Abstract:
In this pictorial essay, Milling discusses the work of eight outstanding North Carolina photographers over the last seven decades.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 1, June 2008, p60-78, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
36513
Author(s):
Abstract:
Holt is receiving this award for his ability to communicate the importance of traditional arts to different audiences from North Carolina to nationwide.
Record #:
8055
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2003, the North Carolina Museum of Art, in recognition of the importance of photography in contemporary art and of the medium's strength among North Carolina's photographers, created a new collection. The collection now has 105 works by ten photographers who live and work in the state. The works cover a variety of subject matter, including landscapes, portraits, architectural vignettes, and folk life. Among the photographers are Elizabeth Matheson, Caroline Vaughan, and Bill Bamberger.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Sept/Oct 2006, p6-7, il
Record #:
8341
Author(s):
Abstract:
For over fifty years, wildlife photographers Jack Dermid and Gene Hester have traveled across North Carolina in search of photographic opportunities. Dermid has a reputation for extraordinary patience in getting exactly the right shot, and Hester travels widely each year in search of waterfowl and deer. Wilson discusses the careers of these two well-known photographers.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
7231
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winston-Salem native Billy Barnes roamed across North Carolina in the 1960s capturing on film what it was like to be poor. His black and white photographs are reminiscent of the documentary style of the Depression-era photographers, like Dorothea Lange and Walker Evans. In this INDEPENDENT interview, Barnes discusses his work and several of his photographs.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 15, Apr 2005, p31-37, il Periodical Website
Full Text: