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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Dougherty, Linda
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Record #:
8055
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2003, the North Carolina Museum of Art, in recognition of the importance of photography in contemporary art and of the medium's strength among North Carolina's photographers, created a new collection. The collection now has 105 works by ten photographers who live and work in the state. The works cover a variety of subject matter, including landscapes, portraits, architectural vignettes, and folk life. Among the photographers are Elizabeth Matheson, Caroline Vaughan, and Bill Bamberger.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Sept/Oct 2006, p6-7, il
Record #:
29516
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Abstract:
Photographer Brian Ulrich’s Copia: Retail, Thrift, and Dark Stores, 2001-2011exhibition shows a decade-long investigation of consumer culture. The photographs show the excess of big-box stores, the discarded items at thrift stores, and the landscape of empty shopping centers in urban areas. Ulrich’s photography is intended to help us learn about our behaviors, habits, comforts, and purpose. The exhibit starts with the events of September 11, 2001 with the “call to spend” by politicians through the financial collapse of 2008 to the present.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2013, p16-19
Record #:
29513
Author(s):
Abstract:
Allen G. Thomas, Jr. of Wilson, NC recently donated over 60 contemporary photographs to the Museum. Select photographs will be exhibited through this spring. The works cover a range of photographic techniques and processes and show the diversity of contemporary photography. Thomas’s collection has proved as a catalyst for the expansion of the Museum’s permanent photography collection.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2014, p26-29, il
Record #:
29520
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Abstract:
The Museum’s newest acquisition of contemporary art is Kehinde Wiley’s "Judith and Holofernes" (2012). Wiley is known for his monumental portraits of African Americans placed in historical poses and settings appropriated from Old Master paintings. Wiley is known for critiquing the racism of art history and this portrait references a 17th century painting by Giovanni Baglione, Judith and the Head of Holofernes (1608). Wiley’s painting can be interpreted as a comment on racial and gender identity and inequity, the representation of women throughout art history, and society’s ideals for beauty.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2013, p20-21
Record #:
29611
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Abstract:
The Museum’s most recent acquisition is Jennifer Steinkamp’s video installation titled Mike Kelley. The image of Steinkamp’s dancing tree is one of the first works visitors see when entering the West Building and has quickly become one of the most popular and captivating works of art at the Museum. The artist uses light, color, and movement to create an image inspired by the natural world, but created using 3-D computer animation software. Projected on a wall, the tree cycles through the four seasons in eight minutes and invites viewers to immerse themselves in the work by taking the time to watch it change.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2010, p20-21
Record #:
29609
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Abstract:
The inaugural exhibition in the Museum’s new North Carolina Gallery is titled Inverted Utopias and features 20 key works by Bob Trotman. North Carolina artist Trotman began his career as a furniture maker before transitioning to a full-time sculpture artist in 1997. Trotman’s painted and carved-wood portraits depict people at dramatic transitional moments on the brink of change. His works are often both humorous and unsettling and in unusual positions.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2010, p6-11
Record #:
29696
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Museum recently acquired a new woven photo work by contemporary artist Dinh Q. Le. Le’s photo-weavings present contradictory histories of the Vietnam War exploring how context, experience, and memory impact our view of history. The artist took film stills from the Hollywood movie Apocalypse Now and weaved them with black-and-white photographs of Vietnamese citizens and images of parachutes taken during or following the Vietnam War.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 2007, p8-9
Record #:
29735
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Abstract:
A new exhibit by the Museum presents 23 large-scale photographs by a diverse group of contemporary photographs who are expanding the size and pushing the boundaries of photography. The photographs include portraits, landscapes, cityscapes, and fabricated worlds and all are unusually large in size. The exhibition addresses the themes of personal identity, fantastic narratives, environmental issues, the changing landscape of cities, systems of power, the passage of time, and images of contemporary life.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , May/June 2007, p10-13
Record #:
29736
Abstract:
The BIG Picture is a new photography exhibition that showcases work on loan from Allen G. Thomas, Jr., Dr. Carlos Garcia-Velez, and the Museum’s expanding photography collection. Previewing the collection, the work of photographers Lorna Simpson, North Carolina’s elin o’Hara slavick, Anthony Goicolea, and Chris Jordan are featured. Their work looks at the role personal and cultural identity plays in our everyday lives. The style, composition, and criticism of 6 works from the 4 artists are detailed.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 2007, p6-9
Record #:
29740
Abstract:
The Museum’s newest affiliate members group, the Friends of Photography, funded the recent acquisition of five new photographs for the Museum’s permanent collection. The new works include two photographs by Seydou Keita of Bamako, Mali and three by Deborah Luster or New Orleans. Four of the photographs are pictured and the artists and their work is detailed.
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Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Sept/Oct 2007, p12-13
Record #:
29502
Abstract:
The Museum recently acquired six new works of art and is opening a new video gallery in the East Building. Giovanni Martinelli’s Memento Mori: Death Comes to the Table circa 1630-38, Yink Shonibare’s, MBE Wind Sculpture II 2013, Flemish, Antwerp School’s Saint Jerome in His Study circa 1560-70, Hieronymus Mittnacht’s Torah Shield 1747-49 are four of the works that were acquired. The artist of each work, an illustration of the work, and a description of the subject and style are detailed. A preview of the upcoming exhibits in the new video gallery is also included and will feature the work of James Nares.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Summer 2014, p14-19