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10 results for Fish stocking
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Record #:
13945
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Abstract:
In the late 19th century, fish were declining in North Carolina's rivers and streams. In attempting to provide food for the people, some of whom were still dealing with the effects of Reconstruction, the state's first fish commission (1877-1885) embarked on a plan of restocking, species introduction, and artificial propagation. Wilson discusses the results of their efforts.
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Record #:
13946
Author(s):
Abstract:
The goal of North Carolina's first fish commission was to provide more fish for the state's people. The commission embarked on a program of stocking native fish and to introduce other species that would survive and increase. Rainbow trout and carp were two of the most successful introductions.
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Record #:
1772
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Volunteers at the Watauga Chapter of Trout Unlimited designed and constructed portable fish-stocking backpack units and donated them to the NC Wildlife Commission. The units are used to transport half-wild brown trout for stocking in remote areas.
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Record #:
13962
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In 1878, Stephen Worth, first superintendent of North Carolina's fish commission, set off to procure brook trout brood stock for the state's beginning hatchery operations. Using excerpts from Worth's report, Wilson describes the effort to accomplish the mission.
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Record #:
26819
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The odds of catching a limit of trout have improved because of a new fisheries program conducted by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission. Selected waters throughout the mountains are now being super-stocked with trout this year.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 6, June 1981, p12
Record #:
28307
Author(s):
Abstract:
Morphological and meristic features of pure and crossed trout species were examined to see if hybrid trout features were intermediate to those of pure parents. Intermediacy was found in almost all hybrids and features. This suggests that problems will remain regarding whether they should be used in stocking streams with natural trout populations.
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Record #:
33296
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Commission permitted the stocking of sterile triploid grass carp at more than fifty locations in twenty-seven counties in North Carolina in 1985. Most stockings were in private ponds and lakes infested with a variety of submerged and floating aquatic weeds. The largest single stocking was with five-thousand fish in Sutton Lake near Wilmington.
Record #:
38161
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The author answers the question of why trout are only stocked in the spring, and not the fall.
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Record #:
38227
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The Stanley County Wildlife Club released 30,000 bluegill fry and 1,000 bass fingerlings into Badin and Tillery Lakes.
Record #:
38530
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Abstract:
New technologies have aided trout hatcheries by enabling long distance travel and reducing infections in the hatcheries.