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50 results for "Wildlife management"
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Record #:
4629
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Abstract:
Some of the state's declining species, including black bear, deer, wild turkey, and bald eagle, made remarkable recoveries during the 20th-century. The challenge of the 21st-century will be to protect and conserve wildlife in a time when population, urban sprawl, and intolerance for wildlife are increasing.
Record #:
26554
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Pete Bromley is the new wildlife extension specialist at the N.C. Agricultural Extension Service, a public outreach program of land grant universities. He is in charge of activities in wildlife, inland fisheries, and aquaculture, and is developing programs in wetland and waterfowl management.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1990, p8-9, il
Record #:
11828
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bottlenose dolphins are killed each year when they become entangled in fishermen's nets. In the Chesapeake Bay gear modifications deter dolphins from entanglement. Seiling reports on research results from a regional marine mammal study conducted in Virginia waters.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2009, p16-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
1946
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Abstract:
The comeback of wood duck populations in the eastern U.S. qualifies as a major wildlife management success story. In 1993 biologists banded over 2,500 wood ducks in the Tuckertown and Pee Dee River reservoirs as part of a new wildlife management program.
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Record #:
8923
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Abstract:
North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has changed its big game reporting system for the for the 1972-1973 hunting season. Previously a compulsory big game tagging system was in effect for all big game killed on the Wildlife Commission's Game Lands, but did not furnish information on big game killed off the game lands. Dean discusses how the new system, a statewide voluntary tagging program, will work.
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Record #:
10240
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A big challenge in bird conservation is determining how many birds in a given species exist and whether that population is increasing or decreasing. Sorenson discusses the Bird Radio System, developed by Ted Simons, a North Carolina State University ornithologist, to help with this challenge.
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Record #:
6630
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early 1950s, the carp population in Lake Mattamuskeet was destroying natural waterfowl food-plants which were necessary for migratory birds that winter at the lake. Cahoon discusses the removal of the carp, the prevention of their reentry into the lake, and the effects of the removal.
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Record #:
31318
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Abstract:
The author recounts her own encounter with a coyote before continuing on with this piece about coexisting with one of North Carolina’s growing populations of natural predators. It is now confirmed that coyote populations are present in all 100 counties in North Carolina
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Record #:
26904
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Abstract:
John Gottschalk, counsel member of the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, presented at the 37th Annual Convention of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation. Wildlife managers face many challenges in this decade, including use and exploitation, disappearing petroleum resources, wetland needs, energy demands and fisheries, and the personal power plant boom.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 7, July 1982, p5-12
Record #:
9800
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Abstract:
The white-tailed deer population in the state is at an all-time high. Scott discusses how this happened and what needs to be done to keep the numbers up.
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Record #:
2482
Author(s):
Abstract:
Restoration of the white-tail deer, which began almost fifty years ago when there were50,000 statewide, has increased the population to over 800,000. As habitats approach their carrying capacity, good management is a necessity.
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Record #:
4744
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Abstract:
Early-successional habitats are areas of a mountain forest that are beginning to recover from events like fires, storms, or logging. First come grasses, then shrubs, and finally trees. All of these stages are important to wildlife survival. Earley discusses the value of early-successional habitats for mountain wildlife, their growing rarity, and what steps are being taken to maintain them.
Record #:
3530
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildlife populations rise and fall. For example, game animals, including deer and wild turkeys, existed in low numbers during most of the 20th-century. However, wildlife management has contributed to their remarkable recovery.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 3, Fall 1997, p2-6, il
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Record #:
26394
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wildlife populations rise and fall. For example, game animals, including deer and wild turkeys, existed in low numbers during most of the 20th-century. However, wildlife management has contributed to their remarkable recovery.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue (44)4, Fall 1997, p2-5, il, por
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Record #:
26527
Abstract:
Eight North Carolina farms are currently participating in a special wildlife management project in which they are willing to modify farm operations to increase wildlife populations on their land. Each farm is managed to fulfill the needs of the landowners and also improve wildlife habitat.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 3, May/June 1990, p14, il, por
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