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6 results for "Rosenwald Schools"
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Record #:
40607
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Abstract:
The Charlotte-Mecklenburg school system, cited as the most segregated in the state, is trying to make an integration comeback through programs such as pairing. Uniting schools such as Billingsville and Cotswold, it offers students from the metro’s poorer sections the same quality education those from more affluent areas have had. In the process, leaders hope this program can also help change Charlotte’s dismal socioeconomic ranking among the largest cities in the US.
Record #:
38123
Author(s):
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Withstanding the test of time is one of the few schools of its kind in Halifax County: Allen Grove Rosenwald School. Making history is a facility on the National Register of Historic Places and started in 1921 to provide an education for African American children.
Record #:
28651
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Coinjock Colored School in Barco, NC is one of about 800 Rosenwald Schools that were built in North Carolina. The school was recently moved to a new location and will be renovated as a shop and a museum. This will allow the school and stories from former students like Lorraine Perry to be preserved. The history of the school, the Rosenwald Schools, and life as a African American student in the segregated South are told.
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Record #:
23587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Geary discusses the history of Hamilton Colored School, a historically black school built with funds from Julius Rosenwald (1862-1932). The school offered grades 1 through 12, a rare opportunity for African American children in the early 1900s.
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Record #:
21527
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article examines North Carolina's experience with the Rosenwald Schools, using Mecklenburg County as the case study. Rosenwald Schools were an educational system for Southern black children who were excluded from white schools. Founded in the 1910s by Booker T. Washington and philanthropist Julius Rosenwald, the schools were a limited success. Over 5,300 schools were constructed throughout the South and Mecklenburg County had 26. By the 1930s though, the Rosenwald Foundation admitted that the schools were not accomplishing the desired effect of educating blacks to live in a white-dominated society. The foundation then stopped funding the schools in order to promote black and white cooperation through other methods.
Source:
North Carolina Historical Review (NoCar F251 .N892), Vol. 65 Issue 4, Oct 1988, p387-444 , il, por, map, f Periodical Website