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17 results for African Americans--Education
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Record #:
2778
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Charlotte Hawkins Brown Memorial State Historic Site in Sedalia is the first to honor a black person and the first to honor a woman. Brown founded Palmer Memorial Institute and led it for fifty years.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 9, Feb 1988, p24-27
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Record #:
3816
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Sedalia in 1902, Charlotte Hawkins Brown founded a unique private school for Afro-Americans, the Palmer Memorial Institute. She was 19. It became one of the finest schools for Afro-Americans in the nation. In 1987, it was designated a state historic site, the Charlotte Hawkins Brown Memorial.
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Record #:
5240
Abstract:
In 1902, Charlotte Hawkins Brown returned to North Carolina. She founded the Palmer Memorial Institute, a unique private school for Afro-Americans in Guilford County. It was her life's work for the next fifty years as she developed the school into one of the nation's premier boarding schools for African-Americans. Now a state historic site, it is marking its one hundredth year with a number of events.
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Record #:
9878
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Sedalia in 1902, Charlotte Hawkins Brown founded a unique private school for African-Americans, the Palmer Memorial Institute. By doing so, she single-handedly changed African-American in North Carolina. Now a state historic site, the Institute is the first site to honor not only an African-American, but a woman of any race.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 11, Apr 2008, p34-37, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
13777
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hammers and saw, brick and concrete, drawing boards and slide rules are winning the battle for equality in the African American education in North Carolina, although segregation controversies have been dominating the headlines.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 46, Apr 1952, p3-5, f
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Record #:
14342
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Abstract:
The progressive Palmer Memorial Institute, which is spreading culture and reducing illiteracy in North Carolina, has its roots deep in the soil of North Carolina, and has been an integral part of the community of Sedalia for almost a half century.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 9, Aug 1947, p6-7,20
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Record #:
15484
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. N. C. Newbold directed the Division of Negro Education from 1913 to 1935. The Pasquotank County native studied at Duke University, Columbia, Yale, and Harvard. During his service as Division of Negro Education in the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction the number of black pupils and teachers dedicated to their tutelage increased greatly from 160,000 students and 2,800 teachers in 1913 to 340,895 students and 6,600 teachers in 1935.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 17, Sept 1935, p3, il
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Record #:
16125
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Abstract:
The Pole Bridge Road School, also known as the Pine Hall Colored School, was an African American educational institution in Stokes County. It opened in 1885 for white children but after it fell into disrepair the building was repurposed for African American students.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Fall 1982, p24-25, il
Record #:
16129
Abstract:
Old London School was the more recognized name for the Walnut Cove Colored School. It operated between 1910 until 1918 before a new facility was built in 1923. Yet another facility would replace the 1923 five room schoolhouse in 1952 and was called the London High School.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Fall 1983, p14-16, il
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Record #:
16195
Abstract:
African American education, denied before the Civil War by the state's anti-literacy laws, actually began during the war when Vincent Coyler, a Union army chaplain, organized the first school for freed people on July 23, 1863. Various organizations were charged with establishing freedmen schools within the state and two men heading this initiative were Reverends Samuel S. Ashley and James Walker Hood.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, Fall 1997, p16-17, il
Record #:
4699
Abstract:
Fresh from her studies at Cambridge, Massachusetts's prestigious English High School, Charlotte Hawkins Brown returned to North Carolina in 1902 to found a unique private school for Afro-Americans in Sedalia near Greensboro. She was 19, and the school was the Palmer Memorial Institute. It became her life's work, as over the next fifty years, Brown developed the school into one of the nation's premier boarding schools for Afro-Americans.
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Record #:
30099
Author(s):
Abstract:
Approximately one-third of North Carolina's population are African Americans; however, there are still hindrances in the state to their success as citizens. In the interest of all North Carolinians, it is the duty of the state to provide better housing, better health care, and better educational opportunities to this population of the state.
Record #:
30109
Author(s):
Abstract:
Students at William and Mary College recently called for the admission of African Americans to the College and advocated for mixed marriages. This provoked Senator William Langer of North Dakota to introduce a bill that would withdraw federal funds from any college which discriminated against African Americans. The students were also revered for being champions of free speech on college campuses.
Record #:
30170
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the first time since the establishment of Wilson County, North Carolina in 1855, African American children will be able to attend modern schools. Twenty-two small schools have been consolidated into two schools with new equipment and facilities.
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