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43 results for "Ghost stories"
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Record #:
35469
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several superstitions and stories concerning the supernatural that was told to the author as a boy by his father.
Record #:
35490
Abstract:
The mysterious light along a set of railroad tracks in this town was resumed to be the ghost of a train engineer. The endurance of the tale throughout the decades and generations can be explained by the adage “everyone loves a good mystery.”
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1976, p20-21
Record #:
35541
Abstract:
The ghost story of “the vanishing hitchhiker” is an internationally known folktale, about a woman who hitches a ride, and then disappears, marking her as a ghost. Five variations of this story have been recorded and reproduced in this article.
Record #:
35586
Abstract:
Located west of Wilmington, the town of Maco has had several strange happenings, particularly by Maco Light, a crossroad.
Record #:
35587
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author collected two old stories about Lincoln County from Thomas Wehunt.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35593
Author(s):
Abstract:
The two stories are about money that is supposedly buried in the remains of a community, and the ghost of Lady Vanderbilt, who haunted a cabin in the woods.
Record #:
35654
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author first heard a ghost story about a ghost that led to the death of its former fiancé from his grandmother, and then collected variations of the same story from other sources.
Record #:
35674
Author(s):
Abstract:
In general, ghosts tend to get a bad rap; they’re frightening and usually originate from some sort of gruesome or untimely death. However, these two stories paint ghosts as helpful creatures, who led people to find hidden money.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35670
Author(s):
Abstract:
A collection of stories from teenage boys about ghosts, haunted houses, murder, and more.
Record #:
35667
Author(s):
Abstract:
A collection of short stories about ghosts, death, the devil, and animals.
Record #:
35686
Abstract:
Hain’ts, not horror films, was thrilling entertainment in Coastal counties such as Sampson and during the author’s youth. As she proved in her illuminations of things that go bump in the dark, though, ghosts chasing and the stories they inspire are really timeless and universal pastimes.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1978, p24-25
Record #:
35694
Author(s):
Abstract:
For Southerners like James and Patty Massey, the War between the States left its presence in stories of what the South had been like before the Yankee invasion. It left ghosts and ghost stories, which proved hauntings happened in ways beyond the War’s decades’ strong aftermath.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1978, p32-34
Record #:
35157
Author(s):
Abstract:
The story of a ghost ship that appears every year at the same time, on fire and following a path back and forth to the same spot. Supposedly, the crew members of the ship had lit it on fire after murdering and robbing the passengers, who were German Protestants, but the ship never burned down.
Record #:
35706
Abstract:
A ghost who hung around Kings Mountain liked to catch rides with unsuspecting people passing by. First he would hop on the back of a horse, then on the backs of trucks when a more modern age arose.
Subject(s):