NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


21 results for "Farmers--Economic conditions"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
19861
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent Federal debate concerning the banning of GMCs or genetically modified crops has the state's farmers concerned for their livelihood. Farmers growing two of the state's biggest crops, soybeans and corn, rely almost exclusively, 90 percent, on GMCs. Public meetings continue to be held by U.S. Fish and Wildlife representatives concerning the planting on refuge lands; currently only 1 percent of the 4 million acres of national wildlife refuge land is cultivated.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
28232
Author(s):
Abstract:
A proposed merger would cause Smithfield Packing to have a monopoly on the hog market in North Carolina. If the merger goes through, farmers would have less leverage to negotiate prices for their product. Politicians in the state have been silent on the issue as Smithfield has contributed money to many party committees and political candidates. Farmers in the state speak about concerns and the effects the merger would have on them.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 14, April 2007, p22 Periodical Website
Record #:
31150
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina State Grange, at work since the 1870s, continues its commitment to improving the quality of rural life through community service, legislative activities and youth leadership programs. The State Grange recently made a case that rural North Carolina and farm families in particular, are going through an economic depression. This article discusses some of their hardships and how Hyde County farmers are expanding their market.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 35 Issue 6, June 2003, p4, por
Record #:
4444
Author(s):
Abstract:
Falling commodity prices, drought, hurricanes, floods, and criticism of tobacco nationwide made 1999 a tough year for farmers. Only one-fourth of the state's farmland escaped Hurricane Floyd's flooding. The cotton crop sustained a $140 million loss, and half the sweet potato crop was lost. Worse yet, the state estimates that 10 to 15 percent of the 55,000 farmers will quit in 2000.
Record #:
21374
Author(s):
Abstract:
An examination of the changes seen among subsistence based yeoman farmers in the state after the construction in the 1850s of the North Carolina Railroad spanning the state from Goldsboro to Charlotte. Taking advantage of new commercial opportunities afforded by the new railroad, yeoman farmers began to produce cash crops, viewing it as a chance to compete equally in a society that was becoming increasingly capitalist.
Source:
Record #:
27548
Abstract:
Poultry is North Carolina’s biggest crop and many residents make a living in the poultry industry. However, many of those workers and farmers who supply the chickens claim the chickens are treated better by poultry companies than they are. Additionally, poultry is not as healthy as the American public believes as many are being exposed to millions of sick birds every year. The industry traps individuals in low paying jobs, exposes them to poor working conditions, and is endangering public health.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 20, July 20-26 1989, p6-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
26646
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1980 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation indicated that 93 million Americans were involved in some form of nonconsumptive wildlife related activity. Billions of dollars were spent on feeding, photographing, or identifying wildlife. In a time when farm incomes are dropping, North Carolina farmers are turning to wildlife recreation resources for alternative income.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p12, il
Record #:
26643
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is losing a lot of traditional farm land because farmers can’t afford to stay in business. In the past, small-game has been a natural by-product of agriculture since most farm land provides habitat for small animals. As farm losses continue, so do small-game populations.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p6, il
Record #:
31359
Author(s):
Abstract:
An amendment has been proposed to establish the North Carolina Agricultural Financing Agency, which would issue revenue bonds to finance capital growth in agriculture. The measure would give farmers a tax-exempt financing source for improvements in production, processing, marketing and distribution of any farm products. More efficient and productive farms would ultimately translate into more economical food prices for the consumer.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 16 Issue 4, Apr 1984, p3
Record #:
31426
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina farmers have been severely damaged by the summer drought, with estimated losses in the state at more than $300 million. This also impacts consumers because the prices of products that use corn, soybeans and wheat are going to be higher in the months ahead. This has prompted calls by North Carolina congressmen for federal aid to ease the burden.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 15 Issue 10, Oct 1983, p26-27, il
Record #:
31617
Author(s):
Abstract:
Farmers are facing one of the most unstable price situations in many decades, according to Dr. W.D. Toussaint, head of the Department of Economics and Business at North Carolina State University. Toussaint discusses how the current period of farm price instability dates back to 1972, when weather conditions were unusually bad. In addition, farming production has been hampered substantially in the past two years by energy problems and a heavier demand for food.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, Apr 1976, p13, il
Record #:
31673
Author(s):
Abstract:
Doug Darch’s farm in rural Wake County is one of many farms fighting for survival in the war on inflation. To meet the problems of inflation, Darch’s strategy is careful planning, wise spending, self-sufficiency, and long work hours. In this article, Darch discusses silo-building operation on his farm and the challenges he has faced with inflation.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 8, Aug 1974, p8-9, por
Record #:
31730
Author(s):
Abstract:
Farmers are struggling to make an adequate income, yet prices paid by consumers continue to rise. Governor Robert Scott proposed an approach called a “New Strategy for Agriculture.” Scott recommends adopting the concept of stability and parity of income as long-term policy goals for modern agriculture, and then establish a national food and fiber board.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 4 Issue 5, May 1972, p6-7, por
Record #:
31732
Author(s):
Abstract:
Farmers in the rugged Appalachian terrain of western North Carolina are expanding their agriculture to grow ornamental shrubbery and Christmas trees as alternatives to their usual farm crops. This article discusses the history of agriculture in this area, the economic challenges farmers face, and the new types of agriculture they are producing.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 4 Issue 6, June 1972, p6-9, il, por
Record #:
32313
Author(s):
Abstract:
Farmers are being hurt by the credit squeeze imposed by North Carolina’s six-percent interest ceiling. Large and small-scale North Carolina farmers have traditionally financed their machinery and equipment, and borrowed for living costs against their crops, through financial institutions. Because higher interest rates in other states are luring away low capital, private credit to farmers is said to be increasingly unavailable in North Carolina.
Source: