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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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26 results for "Bird watching"
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Record #:
31203
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bird enthusiasts enjoy and hope to lure the declining bluebirds to their backyards. North Carolinians have an advantage because bluebirds are present in the state all year. The Bluebird Monitor’s Guide highlights a prominent North Carolina bluebird expert named Jack Finch, and offers tips on how to attract bluebirds and ensure that they return.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 34 Issue 7, July 2002, p24, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
31559
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina offers some excellent places to bird watch, and the opportunity to participate in bird-count studies with local chapters of the National Audubon Society. Birders are particularly interested in sightings of bluebirds, whose population has drastically reduced due to competition from starlings and house sparrows. This article discusses bird watching and how to find bluebird populations in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 10 Issue 2, Feb 1978, p8-10, il, map
Record #:
32055
Author(s):
Abstract:
Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge is a popular birdwatching site located in the Outer Banks of North Carolina. The refuge was primarily established for the Greater Snow Goose, but thousands of other bird species and waterfowl inhabit the refuge.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 6, June 1971, p20-21, il
Record #:
34397
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to a diverse array of great birdwatching spots and natural habitats. Many migratory birds fly to the state during April and May. There are good birding spots along the North Carolina Birding Trail.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 50 Issue 4, Apr 2018, p18-19, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
34583
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Chimney Swift, a migratory bird that nests in North Carolina in early April, is well-known for their chimney roosting habits. These birds collect by the thousands in chimneys across North Carolina from dusk until dawn. With the disappearance or capping of chimneys in residential areas, conservationists have begun designing towers made from brick or concrete for the swifts to live in.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 16 Issue 1, Spring 2008, p2-3, il
Record #:
35576
Author(s):
Abstract:
High Yield Forestry found a yield not measured by lumber, and benefitted more than employees in this industry. The yield was measured also in fowl bagged and birds spotted, the benefactors local hunters and birdwatchers.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p20-21, 33
Record #:
35769
Author(s):
Abstract:
The hobby the hobby hoped readers would fall into was birdwatching. Helping to make this pastime seem more enjoyable were tips such as optimal feeds and feeding stations. Contained also were birds to expect and types of seed they prefer. At the end of the article were a list of books with more information and insights about this entertaining and enlightening activity.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 5, Sept 1979, p22-23
Record #:
36584
Author(s):
Abstract:
N has joined essential vitamins like C in promoting holistic human health. The authors noted that health of body, mind, and spirit can happen by mindfulness, the act of focusing the senses on the present time and surroundings. Related to mindfulness is what they dubbed mindfulness of past experiences, or remembering sensory details affiliated with nature encounters.
Record #:
36468
Author(s):
Abstract:
Birdwatching, also called birding, is touted by the author as one of the fastest growing hobbies in the United States. Birdwatching skills discussed were binocular use, use of field guides, and times to engage in the hobby. Concerning the use of field guides, anatomical features to pay attention to includes shape of the bill, skull, and body; colors of feathers; and songs.
Record #:
38201
Author(s):
Abstract:
A small pine tree can be decorated with edible treats for the enjoyment of the birds and the participants.