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12 results for Waterfowl shooting
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Record #:
25940
Author(s):
Abstract:
This year ends an era of waterfowl hunting on Lake Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge. Despite protests, the US Fish and Wildlife Service have closed the refuge to all hunting activities due to a decline in the flock.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 4, Fall 1973, p8
Record #:
25972
Author(s):
Abstract:
Controversy continues over the closing of W. Kerr Scott Reservoir to hunting. The Wilkes County lake was closed by the US Army Corps of Engineers due to issues with waterfowl hunting. Although the Corps has reopened part of the lake, sportsmen along with the NC Wildlife Resources Commission remain concerned about the Corps’ influence with a public property.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 1, Jan-Feb 1975, p28
Record #:
26083
Author(s):
Abstract:
Waterfowl hunters in North Carolina will be required to use steel shot in portions of several counties under the proposed expansion by the US Fish and Wildlife Service.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 21 Issue 2, Mar-Apr 1977, p19
Subject(s):
Record #:
26401
Author(s):
Abstract:
For the first time since 1973, waterfowl hunting from limited and assigned blinds will be allowed at the Lake Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 3, Sept 1979, p12
Record #:
26541
Author(s):
Abstract:
Only waterfowl hunters using 12-gauge shotguns will be required to use steel shot in non-toxic shot zones in eastern North Carolina.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 24 Issue (27) 11, Nov 1980, p8
Subject(s):
Record #:
26561
Author(s):
Abstract:
Each year, migratory waterfowl succumb to toxic deaths from lead shot, but steel shot is a remedy to this problem. However, resistance to the use of steel shot still exists so some state programs are allowing the FWS to enforce federal steel shot regulations.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Jan 1981, p3
Subject(s):
Record #:
2011
Author(s):
Abstract:
Although more and more waterfowl hunters and guides are using artificial fowl calls to attract ducks and geese, some hunters on Eastern North Carolina's sounds and waterways still employ traditional mouth calling.
Full Text:
Record #:
26780
Author(s):
Abstract:
Due to a decrease in black duck populations, waterfowl hunters can expect harvest restrictions this fall. The Atlantic Flyway Technical Committee biologists recommended to reduce flyway-wide harvest by twenty-five percent.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 30 Issue 4, July/Aug 1983, p6
Record #:
26842
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission made recommendations to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on steel shot regulations and zones. They recommend that waterfowl hunters be required to use steel shot during the coming seasons on all waters and an adjacent zone of land in Currituck, Dare and Pamlico counties.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 8, Aug 1981, p12
Subject(s):
Record #:
26853
Author(s):
Abstract:
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced basic steel shot zones for the state in a continuing effort to reduce lead poisoning in waterfowl. The zones will be standardized across twenty-six states to help hunters make decisions on the type of shells they will need.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 10, Oct 1981, p3, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
31015
Author(s):
Abstract:
Every fall, hordes of waterfowl make their way down south, finding resting spots in North Carolina's sounds and lakes. However, severe drought in Canadian breeding grounds resulted in lesser populations. This with the higher cost of Federal duck stamps resulted in fewer waterfowl hunters for the season. This led to a 21 percent decrease in the numbers of waterfowl harvested. But when contrasted with other states, North Carolina more than gets its share.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
35576
Author(s):
Abstract:
High Yield Forestry found a yield not measured by lumber, and benefitted more than employees in this industry. The yield was measured also in fowl bagged and birds spotted, the benefactors local hunters and birdwatchers.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 4, Aug/Sept 1973, p20-21, 33