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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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70 results for "Markovich, Jeremy"
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Record #:
34899
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The Agnes Fry shipwreck was recently found near the mouth of the Cape Fear River. The Agnes Fry had a long career as a Confederate blockade runner during the American Civil War. Billy Ray Morris, director of the Underwater Archaeology Branch of North Carolina, has been able to identify it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 1, June 2017, p136-144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34906
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In Charlotte, North Carolina, a quiet neighbor was planned in the 1920’s. At the time, sprawling green lawns were edged with willow oaks. Now, they loom far overhead and have long branches that make a shaded ceiling over the roads. This article outlines the architect and arborist behind the planned neighborhood.
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Record #:
34949
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The city of Charlotte has seen fast expansion since the 1970’s, largely due to the Bank of America merger of 1998 by Hugh McColl. McColl, who fought to keep the Bank of America headquarters in Charlotte, used the bank to invest in the arts, professional sports, restaurants, hotels and more in order to keep developing Charlotte.
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Record #:
34959
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North Carolina is known as the birth place of American forestry. Pioneers in the field such as Gifford Pinchot and Dr. Carl Schenk began their work in North Carolina, and created tactics such as prescribed burns, selective thinning, and management plans. This has ensured a profitable logging industry while keeping forests sustainable and healthy.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 5, October 2017, p120-134, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
34976
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After the Fontana Dam was built in the 1944, seventeen miles of the Fontana Valley area was flooded. Family cemeteries that were above the flood waters have since been restored by the National Park Service under the direction of former resident Helen Cable Vance. Every Sunday between April and October, a group of people go to one of the twenty-seven family cemeteries for its Decoration Day.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 6, November 2017, p154-160, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36993
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Because of recent immigration trends, approximately forty percent of people receiving American citizenship were not born in North Carolina. Moreover, in nearly one-fifth of the state’s counties, naturalized citizens comprise a majority of the population. As for other ways naturalized citizens have affected the state, the author examines tangible and intangible factors. The tangible includes food and tradition; the intangible includes a sense of hope and determination.
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Record #:
36959
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A companion to “Hole in the Wall Joints: Tried and True,” this article profiled nine restaurants located in towns stretching from the coast to the mountains and whose menus range from seafood to snacks. Local spots that became the hearts of their towns included Waterfront Seafood Shack, Kitty Hawk; Allen and Son, Chapel Hill; and Dots Dario, Marion.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 3, August 2017, p90-94, 96, 98, 100-102, 104, 106, 108, 110-114 Periodical Website
Record #:
25102
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In the mountains of Buncombe County, near Leicester, North Carolina, Dr. Frank King owns a farm. The farm is not home to the typical farm animals, but rather to bison, camels, Watusi, elk, and more. Frank offers tours of the farm and provides visitors with information about the health benefits of the products made from and produced by these animals.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 11, April 2016, p160-166, 168, 170, 172-173, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
27404
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Marshall Rauch, a 93 year old Jewish man from Gastonia, was the biggest producer of Christmas ornaments in the world from 1962-1995. He also served in the North Carolina Senate from 1967-1998. He is still quite busy as an investor, and has lived quite a charitable life.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 7, December 2016, p106-112, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
27405
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Mistletoe is poisonous if eaten by humans and does not float, and is famously used around Christmas for kissing. Joe Huss has boat rides on the Cashie River where people gather mistletoe, and is quite familiar with the different qualities of the plant.
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Record #:
27284
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Salisbury is a small town in Rowan County. Food Lion was founded there and the town is also home to Catawba College. In the late twentieth century, early Food Lion investors became millionaires due to the success of the supermarket chain. Many of these investors stayed in Salisbury and invested the money in their community, all the while helping to preserve it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p60, 62, 64, 66, 68-69, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
27287
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In 2014, Sierra Nevada began brewing in Mills River, North Carolina. Due to the popularity of Sierra Nevada’s Pale Ale, the company needed to expand to the East Coast, leading them to North Carolina. Located between Hendersonville and Asheville, the brewery is massive and a huge attraction for visitors and locals.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p140-142, 144, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
27286
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Located in Henderson County, Hendersonville thrives off of the success of nearby Asheville. Hendersonville offers a number of attractions, including an aquarium, over 30 non-chain restaurants, amazing views, and mountain charm.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 5, October 2016, p130-134, 136, 138, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
28678
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Carolyn Mason was instrumental in protecting the wild Shackleford Banks horses. Mason helped lead and organize a campaign to protect the free range horses in 1995. The details of her campaign and its effect on the local horse population are detailed.
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Record #:
23902
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In 1963, North Carolinians searched for a way to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the charter that created North Carolina. They settled on reenacting Daniel Boone's trek through the Blue Ridge Mountains with a wagon train traveling from a farm in Wilkes County to Boone. The reenactment became an annual event until 1974 when locals lost interest as national social and political issues took their toll on these communities.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 1, June 2015, p45-46, 48, il, por Periodical Website
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