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48 results for "Manual, John"
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Record #:
3918
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Riparian buffers, or wide strips of vegetation along stream and river banks, are effective filters in keeping pollutants from reaching the water. They also control erosion and attract wildlife. One of the most aggressive water pollution plans is a state-mandated one requiring retention of 50-foot-wide buffers on all Neuse River Basin streams.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 4, Fall 1998, p2-6, il
Record #:
4142
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By making some changes in the backyard, homeowners can create wildlife habitats. Adding water will attract many creatures. A birdbath is the simplest way. Reduce lawn size and add more trees, flowers, and shrubs. Put out bird feeders and boxes. Stack logs and rocks to provide nesting places. Control the cat, so that attracted wildlife will not feed the family pet.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Spring 1999, p2-6, il
Record #:
4261
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Greenville was once a sleepy, agricultural community, but in 1999, it is a city with a growing population and a variety of employment opportunities. Factors contributing to this change include East Carolina University, Pitt County Memorial Hospital, retail trade, and an increasing number of domestic and foreign business relocations.
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Record #:
4711
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Clear-cutting in Chatham County is rapidly bringing down forests and woodlots. The technique allows trees to be cut, then ground into wood chips on the spot using one of the eighteen modular chip mills operating around the state. New markets, land for development, and farmers needing extra cash are factors supporting clear-cutting. Opponents argue that mobile chip mills make clear-cutting easier and are seeking to halt new chip mill construction until their effect on soil, wildlife, and water quality can be determined.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 5, Feb 2000, p21-23, 25, 26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4720
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Demand for raw materials for global wood and paper markets, urban sprawl, and need for recreational outlets are changing North Carolina's forests and affecting wildlife populations. Manuel lists three trends in modern forestry and discusses their effect on wildlife: modular chip mills; replacing natural forests with pine plantations; and logging in publicly owned national forests.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 48 Issue 2, Summer 2000, p2-7, il
Record #:
4827
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Manuel gives a brief history of lotteries and arguments for and against having them. He then discusses concerns people have about lotteries including are lotteries a reliable source of revenue? do lotteries promote compulsive gambling? who benefits most from lottery revenues? and what state programs are earmarked to receive lottery funds?
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 19 Issue 1/2, Oct 2000, p2-9, 11-49, 56-57, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
5252
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Charter schools were established by legislation in the state in 1996 to determine if schools run by private, non-profit organizations with limited state regulations would improve student performance. Manuel discusses four of these schools: Exploris Middle School, Raleigh; SPARC Academy, Raleigh; American Renaissance, Statesville; Haliwa-Saponi Tribal School, Hollister.
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Record #:
5332
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Since the mid-20th-century small game, including quail and rabbits, has been declining in North Carolina. To stem this loss, the North Carolina Division of Wildlife Management has established a program called CURE, or Cooperative Upland Restoration and Enhancement. Manuel discusses the organization of the program.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Spring 2002, p2-6, il
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Record #:
6970
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North Carolina is slowly restoring animals that were largely or entirely extirpated during the last century. Reintroductions include the otter, beaver, elk, wild turkey, and red wolf. The Horizon 2100 plan calls for the reintroduction of the Eastern cougar. This animal is what is called an “apex predator,” or an animal that sits at the top of the food chain. Manuel discusses whether large predators should be brought back into North Carolina and whether they can possibly coexist with people in the twenty-first century.
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Record #:
7197
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The approximately 160,000 acres of the Croatan National Forest lie in parts of Carteret, Craven, and Jones Counties. The forest has a rich variety of wildlife and plant species that can be observed from trails such as the Neusiok or the Pine Cliffs along the Neuse River. As part of the Croatan Game Land, hunters will find wild turkeys, deer, and black bears. Some of the best blackwater fishing in North Carolina is found in the waterways. Camping facilities ranges from primitive sites to those with electricity.
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Record #:
7660
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In 2006, northern glaciers melt faster; sea levels rise; and warmer ocean waters expand. Global warming, driven by the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, is affecting life on the planet. Manuel reviews scientific information to project how these changes will affect plants, animals, and humans in North Carolina by the year 2100. In August 2005, North Carolina joined nearly forty other states in taking the initiative on global warming with the passage of the N.C. Global Warming Act. Among the act's requirements are the creation of a thirty-four member commission that will consider impacts on the state from rising temperatures and evaluate recommendations to reduce pollution.
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Record #:
9165
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The North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research first evaluated charter schools in 2002. The conclusion then was that the state should continue the experiment and wait for five more years of data before deciding whether or not to expand the program and remove the cap which limited the number of schools to one hundred. Manuel discusses what the new data tells about academic performance, racial balance, transfers of innovations in charter schools to public schools, and management and financial compliance.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 22 Issue 2-3, May 2007, p2-28, 32-37, 44-71, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
9164
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Legislation passed by the 1996 General Assembly provides for the establishment of charter schools, or schools run by private, non-profit organizations. It is an experiment to see if removing state regulations will improve student performance. Manuel profiles four of these schools: Gaston College Preparatory, Northampton County; Quest Academy, North Raleigh; Children's Community School, Davidson; and Carolina International School, Cabarrus County.
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Record #:
17765
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For 200 years, Merchants Millpond in the northeast corner of North Carolina has enchanted visitors with giant cypress trees and unique wildlife. This man-made body of water is also a relic of a bygone age of machinery-operated hydropower.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p178-180, 182, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18835
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North Carolina economy shifted from manufacturing to service based and created a gap in the workforce. Vacancies in such jobs as allied health, nursing, pharmaceuticals, and laboratory technicians were not being filled adequately with skilled workers. The author proposes five changes to the community college system to be enacted both by the General Assembly and State Board of Education to facilitate community college's offering degrees to fill theses openings. Some of these proposed changes included differentiated funding for certain community college programs and establishing licensure track degrees exclusively through the community college system.
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