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80 results for "Dean, Jim"
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Record #:
35564
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A study in contrasts was the two bikes, the first given at age ten, the other purchased recently. One was light as a feather, the other seemingly weighed half a ton. One was easy to navigate up hills, the other hard to get up the front steps. With the benefits the more recent of the two offered, trips through towns like Edenton or Beaufort seemed less like exercise and more like joy rides.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p10, 37, 42
Record #:
25938
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Lake Mattamuskeet has been known as one of the best places for Canadian geese hunting in the world, but the lake has gone to bust over the past decade. Dean details the findings presented in a July issue of Wildlife in North Carolina written by NCWRC waterfowl biologist Jack Donnelley, US Bureau of Sport Fishreis and Wildlife biologist Otto Florschutz, and Mattamuskeet Refuge Manager John Davis. Research found that dwindling geese populations could be attributed to changes in corn and soybean production in North Carolina, as well as excessive hunting pressure in the area.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 16 Issue 3, Summer 1973, p15-16
Record #:
25987
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The Robeson County Wildlife Club carries the conservation message from one end of the county to the other. In various cities throughout the county, the Club provides programs such as beautification projects, educational programs, and participation in law and legislation change.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p21
Record #:
9763
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On March 26, 1984, the Prudential Insurance Company gave to the federal government 120,000 acres in Tyrrell and Dare Counties. The property is worth $50 million and will become part of the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.
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Record #:
35569
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Two observations offered an explanation for its ability to help anglers reel in the catch of the day. One was its ability to sink slowly; the other, its resemblance to forms of aquatic insects.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p30-32
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Record #:
26320
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A new program, Renewed Emphasis Now on an Environmental for Wildlife (RENEW), helps farmers prepare parts of their land for improving populations of small game animals.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 22 Issue 2, Spring 1978, p14
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Record #:
26943
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North Carolina angler Jim Dean tells a story about one of his bass fishing experiences at a small lake near Raleigh. He hooked a largemouth bass near a sunken brush pile and fallen tree, but soon realized the fish was wrapped up in the tree limbs. Jim’s fishing buddy dove fourteen feet into the lake to free the bass.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 9, Sept/Oct 1982, p6
Record #:
9150
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In Part 2 of this series on trout fishing and trout habitat in North Carolina, Dean discusses effects on trout produced by human activity. It takes only one sand and gravel operation, one careless timber cut, one new development, or a new road to destroy a trout stream.
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Record #:
6048
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Before the bridges spanned the state's rivers and creeks, ferries transported people, animals, and various cargoes across waterways. It is believed the Quakers owned and operated the first ferry in 1700 in the Albemarle Sound area. Early ferries were private enterprises, and it was not until 1741 that the first free ferry was established. Once numerous, only ten ferries are in use today, seven along the coast and three on inland waterways.
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Record #:
8916
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On June 7, 1971, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission voted to adopt a new Game Lands program. The new program involves the expansion of the game lands from around 700,000 acres to 1.5 million acres. When the question is raised about how fish and wildlife will be protected in the larger territory the answer is that it will be as good or better then it was when the game lands were smaller. Dean discusses how the new lands will be protected.
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Record #:
8923
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North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission has changed its big game reporting system for the for the 1972-1973 hunting season. Previously a compulsory big game tagging system was in effect for all big game killed on the Wildlife Commission's Game Lands, but did not furnish information on big game killed off the game lands. Dean discusses how the new system, a statewide voluntary tagging program, will work.
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Record #:
9842
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The North Carolina General Assembly passed legislation in 1987 requiring mandatory wearing of blaze orange when hunting certain types of big-game in the state. Warning tickets will be given during the 1987 hunting season with full implementation in 1988.
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Record #:
19264
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Dean discusses the ways to improve the numbers of wildlife that inhabit older ponds. This often involves draining the pond to see what is going on beneath the surface, and starting the process from scratch.
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Record #:
12237
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Dean discusses things to consider when planning to build a new fishing pond or when seeking to improve the fishing in an older one.
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Record #:
19273
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Dean discusses what steps to take when improving the fishing in a new or renovated pond, and the people to turn to when you need advice.
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