NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


7 results for Trout fisheries--North Carolina, Western
Currently viewing results 1 - 7
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
24521
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article discusses the operational logistics of running a trout farm in Transylvania County, North Carolina. Overall, there are about a dozen commercial trout farms in North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 3, August 1977, p14-15, 35-36, il
Full Text:
Record #:
26552
Author(s):
Abstract:
Automatic fish feeders are being suspended over two miles of trout streams to boost fish sizes and native populations in the North Carolina mountains.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1990, p4, por
Record #:
9076
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Part 1 of a new series, Dean discuss the state's mountain trout fishery.
Full Text:
Record #:
9150
Author(s):
Abstract:
In Part 2 of this series on trout fishing and trout habitat in North Carolina, Dean discusses effects on trout produced by human activity. It takes only one sand and gravel operation, one careless timber cut, one new development, or a new road to destroy a trout stream.
Full Text:
Record #:
7150
Abstract:
In 2004, the mountain areas of North Carolina suffered flooding from three autumn hurricanes. While the Pigeon River and its tributaries and the Davidson River were severely affected by the flooding, most of the trout fishery in Western North Carolina escaped with minor damage.
Full Text:
Record #:
22613
Abstract:
The Apalachia Reservoir is the first reservoir in North Carolina to be managed as a trophy trout fishery. In 2012 the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission stocked 5,000 trout (brown and rainbow). The stocks have continued to thrive as they take advantage of the presence of the invasive blueback herring.
Record #:
33291
Author(s):
Abstract:
Trout production in western North Carolina is big business, comprising of over eighty producers plus numerous trout “fish-out” operations. North Carolina State University and other state entities are offering additional assistance in trout aquaculture and research in Haywood and Transylvania Counties.