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20 results for The State Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984
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Record #:
8293
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James Mooney of the U.S. Bureau of American Ethnology visited the Qualla Reservation of the Cherokees in 1877, gathered plants which the Indians used for food and medicine and did research on Cherokee myths. Most of what Money collected was donated to him by the Cherokee's leading shaman, an Indian named “Swimmer.” Swimmer also served in the Civil War, as a second sergeant of the Cherokee Company A, Sixty-Ninth North Carolina Confederate Infantry, Thomas Legion. With encouragement from Mooney, Swimmer compiled his knowledge of Cherokee culture and traditions into a 240-page book known as the Swimmer Manuscript, containing prayers, songs, and prescriptions to cure diseases.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p32, por
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Record #:
8302
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In 1942, the Coast Guard Cutter ICARUS (WPC-110) sank the German submarine the Unterseeboot 352 off the coast of North Carolina, twenty-six miles south of Morehead City. At 218 feet long, 871 tons, and 115 feet down on the sandy ocean floor, the U-352 is another relic of the Graveyard of the Atlantic. In 1975, a diver discovered an armed torpedo, 88 mm shells, and the remains of ten Nazi sailors still inside the submarine.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p79, 80
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Record #:
8893
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The coastal region of North Carolina was home to over 155 windmills during the 18th- and 19th-centuries. The windmills incorporated a post-mill design better suited for the region than tower-mills. Post-mills were effective because they allowed the windmill to be turned into the wind, were cheaper to construct, and were made with materials available in eastern North Carolina. Coastal mills were built for grinding grain or pumping water. Researcher Tucker Littleton found that in North Carolina, mills built above the Onslow County-Pender County line tended to be grist mills while those built below the line tended to be water mills. Littleton also discovered that Carteret County contained the largest number of windmills. Few North Carolinians remember the role windmills played in the state's past. Lynanne Westcott is trying to change this as she has built an exact replica of a 19th-century windmill in Manteo.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p7-8, por
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Record #:
8894
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Visitors have been coming to Pilot Mountain for many years. Located in Surry County, Pilot Mountain is a rock protrusion that elevates two-hundred feet from its base. Visitors once could climb to the mountain's peak by way of four oak ladders that were attached to the rock face. Guided by locals, visitors were led to a place on the mountain with a rock formation that closely resembles a man's footprint. Local legend says that Moses stepped off the ark and left the footprint. Climbing to the mountaintop is no longer possible as the North Carolina Parks Department now maintains the property. The ladders are gone and people are no longer allowed to climb to the mountaintop because the area is classified as a wildlife refuge.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p11, por
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Record #:
8898
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Cornelia Phillips Spencer led the movement for North Carolina to make a flag to be included in the centennial Independence celebration in 1876. While only a decade removed from the Civil War, Spencer believed North Carolina's Revolutionary heroes should be honored with North Carolina's participation in the celebration. The flag hung in Independence Hall for a year. It was then returned to North Carolina where it was placed in the Wilson Library at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Eventually the flag was taken down and stored away, but it has since been lost.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p24, 25, por
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Record #:
8892
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North Carolinians speak a peculiar mix of southern and folk. The Tar Heel language, a reflection of a rural past, is dying under the growth of the New South. Guy Owen, however, is working to record the Tar Heel language through his writing. An author of several books, Owen sets his stories in rural North Carolina and includes old-time folk sayings. The Duke University Press is also preserving North Carolina's linguistic heritage in its Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore. Included in the article are many of the typical Tar Heel folk sayings.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p5-6, por
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Record #:
8897
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The whaling industry began along the North Carolina coast during the 17th-century. Prized for their oil and bones, whales were hunted primarily between February and April as they migrated toward northern waters. Whaling was a community activity. Men would man the ships and bring in the catch while women and children waited onshore readying scrapping knives and tending fires to boil the oil from blubber. In 1899 a hurricane ravaged Camp Lookout. The hurricane, and a dwindling whale population, ended North Carolina's whaling industry.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p22-23, il, por
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Record #:
8896
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There is a legend in Asheville that surrounds the Biltmore Estate. George Vanderbilt constructed his mansion during the 1890s. The project brought jobs to the region and all residents were happy, almost. One refused to sell his land. That mountaineer wanted to keep his property because it was had been his family's land for over three generations. The gentleman held onto his property until his death. Reprinted from the April 1, 1968 edition.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p18-19, por
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Record #:
8895
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A humorous article, Pearce argues that kudzu was developed by the Japanese during the Great Depression to take over the United States.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p12-13, por
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Record #:
8907
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The Civil War witnessed many fierce battles. One such battle took place on June 26, 1863 outside of Richmond, Virginia. There, Company A of the 44th North Carolina Regiment fought against Union Calvary and infantry. Their mission was to protect the North Anna River bridge which was a vital route in Richmond's railroad network. Company A was led by Tazewell Lee Hargrove of Vance County. The company held out but eventually succumbed to superior numbers. Every soldier in Company A was either killed or wounded during the battle.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p74-76, il, por
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Record #:
8905
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In 1929, the city of Gastonia erupted into a bitter struggle between textile factory owners and workers. Employees at the Loray Mill walked off the job when Fred Beal, who had been organizing a strike, was fired. Violence quickly broke out and in the ensuing weeks Police Chief W. O. Aderholt and strike leader Ella May Wiggins were killed. During the night the one-hundred black cars roamed Gastonia's streets looking for strikers to assault. A trial was held regarding Aderholt's murder. Several of those convicted of the crime fled to Russia seeking asylum. The Loray strike is a tragic episode in Gastonia's history.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p54-56, por
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Record #:
8904
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Robert Lee Humber successfully lobbied $1,000,000 from the North Carolina legislature in 1947. Humber had obtained a promise from the Kress Foundation in New York that they would match the legislature up to $1,000,000 in purchasing art. Humber lobbied legislatures into passing a bill that stipulated that if money was left over at the end of the year that money would be used for matching the Kress Foundation. The funds were matched and the North Carolina Museum of Art now exists because of Humber's efforts. Article is reprinted from the January 12, 1957 issue.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p49-50, por
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Record #:
8903
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A story is told in Beaufort County about the death of Squire L. J. Lewis. Lewis became sick and was taken to a hospital in Washington, NC. There he recovered and decided to purchase an organ for his wife. The organ was sent ahead of Lewis. When it arrived no one knew what was inside, but given the shape and weight of the box they believed it to be Lewis' body sent by the hospital. The family notified the neighbors and held a funeral. Lewis returned home and scared his family. The misunderstanding was soon realized and the organ was dug out of the graveyard. This article is an October, 1970 reprint.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p47, il
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Record #:
8906
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Between 1916 and 1926, the Pinehurst community experienced a boom period. Not all booms were economic. Some came from the end of Annie Oakley's gun when she gave marksmanship demonstrations. Oakley also taught women the art of shooting. Her demonstrations often included shooting holes in pennies that were thrown into the air, shooting off the ashes from her husband's cigarettes, and shooting six glass balls thrown into the air before any could hit the ground. Oakley usually completed her performance while never looking directly at the targets.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p60-61, por
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Record #:
8901
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Tobacco advertising has changed through the years. Early 19th-century advertisements featured men and women joyously smoking and walking together. J.B. Duke created the first major tobacco advertising campaign with Bull Durham cigarettes. He also sold the first cigarettes marketed for women: White Rose and American Beauties, and conceived the idea of including picture-cards in cigarette packs that served as advertisement and stiffened the cigarette box offering greater protection for the tobacco. In 1911 R.J. Reynolds began a marketing campaign that focused on only one cigarette -- Camels.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p34-35, il, por
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