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25 results for Biltmore Estate (Asheville)
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Record #:
2956
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville's Biltmore House, the country's largest private residence, attracts almost a million visitors yearly to view the 250-room French Renaissance chateau and surrounding grounds.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 7, July 1996, p60, il
Record #:
4250
Author(s):
Abstract:
The L. Vincent Lowe, Jr. Award is the highest preservation award given to a state business for promoting protection of architectural resources in the state. William A. V. Cecil received the 1996 award for turning neglected Biltmore Estate in Asheville into a major tourist attraction, while at the same time stimulating economic growth in the region.
Source:
North Carolina Preservation (NoCar Oversize E 151 N6x), Vol. Issue 102, Winter 1997, p5, por
Record #:
4371
Author(s):
Abstract:
With four acres under roof, Asheville's Biltmore Estate is the country's largest private home. When Christmas at Biltmore began in 1976, $50,000 was spent on decorating, and a few thousand visitors came. Today over $1 million is spent on decorations, and over 200,000 come to look at them between November 6 and January 2. Among the decorations are 38 Christmas trees, some 40 feet high; 300 wreaths; and 4 miles of garland.
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Record #:
6851
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Biltmore Estate in Asheville is one of North Carolina's premier tourist attractions. Visitors are usually unaware of the many activities that go on behind the scenes to keep the place running for their enjoyment. Vora describes some of the activities of the estate's 1,600 employees, such as mowing pasture-size lawns, repairing building damage brought on by a century of wear and weather, and making wine.
Record #:
7203
Author(s):
Abstract:
When George Washington Vanderbilt built Biltmore House in the 1890s, he was constructing more than just a large house. He envisioned his 125,000-acre estate as being self-sufficient, growing its own food, weaving its own cloth, and raising its own meat. Wright discusses how this philosophy carries on into the twenty-first century. One million people visit Biltmore annually and spend around $183.4 million. The estate employs 1,500 people, and its economic impact on western North Carolina is about $351 million annually.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 5, May 2005, p48, il
Record #:
8149
Author(s):
Abstract:
Winemaker, Pilippe Jourdain, produced the Biltmore Estate's first grape crop in 1978. Since then, Biltmore vineyards have produced a variety of wines. Currently, 120 acres of commercial grape vineyards are producing 35,000 cases of wine per year. This number is expected to grow to over 100,000 cases per year by 1994. This growth will come with the completion of a 30,000-square-foot, $6.5 million winery. The winery is scheduled to begin construction in September 1984. While production is expected to increase, Mr. Jourdain still focuses on the quality of Biltmore Vineyard's products rather than the quantity.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 3, Aug 1984, p2, por
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Record #:
8896
Author(s):
Abstract:
There is a legend in Asheville that surrounds the Biltmore Estate. George Vanderbilt constructed his mansion during the 1890s. The project brought jobs to the region and all residents were happy, almost. One refused to sell his land. That mountaineer wanted to keep his property because it was had been his family's land for over three generations. The gentleman held onto his property until his death. Reprinted from the April 1, 1968 edition.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p18-19, por
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Record #:
9606
Abstract:
William Amherst Vanderbilt Cecil, Jr. and Diana Cecil Pickering, great-grandchildren of George Vanderbilt, the builder of Biltmore House and Estate, discuss growing up there and later becoming part of the family business that runs it.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 6, Nov 2007, p72-74, 76, 78-79, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10440
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1897, George W. Vanderbilt traveled to the English Isle of Jersey to collect a choice herd of Jersey cattle. Originally intended for family use, the milk was used locally during the winter when the Vanderbilt family returned to the North. Vanderbilt was reluctant to stop local usage of his dairy when he returned the next summer, so he expanded his herd. Biltmore Dairy Farms has been adding to the herd ever since, and today there is a prize herd of 1,200 cows on the estate.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 23 Issue 6, Nov 1965, p108-109, 188-189, il
Record #:
11013
Abstract:
In 1897, George W. Vanderbilt traveled to the English Isle of Jersey to collect a choice herd of Jersey cattle intended for family use. Today there are 1,500 Jerseys in the herd at Biltmore Dairy Farms, one of the largest and finest dairy herds in the world.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 28 Issue 11, Nov 1970, p128, 264-265, il
Record #:
11980
Abstract:
Biltmore House, the home of George Vanderbilt near Asheville, opened to the public in 1930. When William Cecil, Vanderbilt's grandson, returned to claim his inheritance in 1960, he found the property beginning to show signs of age and losing money. Over the next two decades Cecil spent millions upgrading the property, which now attracts over 400,000 visitors a year.
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Record #:
12241
Abstract:
After ten years of planning and planting, Biltmore Estate is getting a winery. The $6.5 million project will be handled by the Biltmore Estate Wine Company. Construction will begin immediately.
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We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 41 Issue 11, Nov 1983, p108, 110, 155-156, il
Record #:
12264
Author(s):
Abstract:
In celebration of The Biltmore House's bicentennial, remodeling efforts have been made on the one un-finished room of the estate. Thought to be an intended music room, the owners have deemed it the \"Pisgah Room\" because of the room's view of Mount Pisgah. The room's decor will have a medieval motif and will hold Albrecht Durer's painting \"Maximillian's Family Tree.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 12, May 1975, p12-14, il
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Record #:
13237
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Washington Vanderbilt built his 250-room mansion, the Biltmore House and accompanying gardens, in Asheville in the 1890s. Hales discusses the commercial interests on the estate today that continue to add to the family fortune.
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Record #:
13718
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biltmore, the home of George Vanderbilt near Asheville, is North Carolina's grandest home. Henion describes the behind the scenes and inner workings of the mansion through four tours: The Butler's Tour; The Vanderbilt Family and Friends Tour; The Legacy of the Land Tour; and The Architect's Tour.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 78 Issue 10, Mar 2011, p80-86, 88, 90, 92, 94-96, il Periodical Website
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