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6 results for The Researcher Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010
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Record #:
34788
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1865, the first menhaden factory was established on Harkers Island. While today Carteret County is well known for the Beaufort and Morehead City fisheries, Harkers Island still participates in the industry during the warmer summer months. Historically, families living closest to fish factories in Davis and Smyrna, North Carolina, held seasonal positions as crew members and factory workers. In total, forty-four boats were involved in the Harkers Island fisheries which covered areas in the Core Sound. Approximately twenty-six were locally built, although few of these were designed for specific use in the fishery. This article addresses various fishing vessels and the histories of their owners.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010, p1-5, il
Record #:
34789
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the 1950s, the author worked as a summer camp counselor at Camp Morehead. Primarily a boys’ camp, three weeks were set aside each summer for co-ed habitation. The author herself had attended camp during one such session where she learned to sail. Returning in college as a counselor, the author was placed in charge of sailing instruction and office duty which included running errands. Throughout the summer, campers were brought into Morehead City to visit various stores and enjoy some of the local cuisine.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010, p5-7, il, por
Record #:
34792
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Ben Royal started the first Morehead City hospital with support from the U.S. Public Health Service and local community members. Edith Broadway was hired as a nurse in 1912 to assist with operations. Her work, however, far exceeded her title. Broadway and Royal worked tirelessly to assist residents of Morehead City and surrounding areas; beginning with only seven beds, the duo worked to expand service to eighteen patients. Following the flu epidemic of 1918, Royal and Broadway continued to raise funds for a larger, more adequate facility. Their work manifested in a new building and improved medical facilities. The two worked side by side through the Second World War. Overall, Broadway dedicated 31 years to the Morehead City hospitals.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010, p11-13, il, por
Record #:
34793
Author(s):
Abstract:
In early January 1918, a snow storm passed through the Outer Banks, bringing plummeting temperatures. In turn, Bogue Sound froze over for the first time in remembered history. A slab of ice three inches thick covered the water and the boats. A local resident recalled that the ice was thick enough to cross the sound over to Bogue Banks. Several families did push their skiffs across, in case of ice breakage. Another group of residents was stranded in their boat out on the frozen water. They eventually abandoned the vessel and successfully crossed the ice. While low temperatures still occur, there has not been another big freeze of Sound waters since 1918.
Source:
Record #:
34791
Author(s):
Abstract:
In April 1921, the schooner JAMES E. NEWSOM struck Bluefish Lump Shoal and grounded near Cape Lookout, North Carolina. The sailing master and crew abandoned the vessel and began rowing towards the Cape Lookout Lighthouse. Meanwhile, several of the Coast Guardsmen noticed the vessel aground and went out to investigate. Finding NEWSOM empty, they returned to the station where they met the crew. The following day, the station lookout sighted a sail on the horizon. As the vessel grew nearer, the Guardsman recognized the NEWSOM which had gracefully ungrounded and drifted into shore. The crew soon boarded and found NEWSOM in good working condition.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010, p9-11
Record #:
34790
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beaufort’s port, established 1722, served as a North Carolina port of entry throughout the colonial period. A customs officer was located in the port to handle collections for the district which included the southern and eastern parts of Carteret County. In the mid-18th century, the district was enlarged to include Ocracoke, Bogue Inlet, and the Neuse River. A secondary officer was appointed to oversee vessels loading and unloading cargo in the Neuse River. As coastal trade migrated to New Bern throughout the century, so did the customs officials. During the war of 1812, Beaufort became a significant port for privateer operations and continued to grow in use through the 1860s. The last customs office opened in 1908 and operated until 1952, when it moved to Morehead City.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010, p7-8