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9 results for The Researcher Vol. 24 Issue 2, Fall-Spring 2008/2009
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Record #:
34764
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Following the United States entrance into World War II in 1942, the battle for the north Atlantic was going poorly. Over 600 ships and six million tons of shipping were destroyed by German U-boats. These engagements became known as a wild turkey shoot. Vessels offshore from Morehead City and Beaufort were seen damaged and sinking on a daily basis; they were often attacked by German forces during the night. The Morehead City hospital was expanded to increase services to burned and injured sailors.
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Record #:
34768
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Following the surrender of General Cornwallis at Yorktown, Virginia, skirmishes between rebels and loyalists continued. In April 1782, three loyalist vessels anchored in Beaufort harbor to conduct a raid against colonists. A small group of Continental Army members joined forces, guarding granaries and warehouses in Harkers Island and Beaufort. While the British and loyalists were able to take control of the town fort, they did not capture the stores at Harkers Island.
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Record #:
34767
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A “rum-chaser” boat was purchased for use at the Beaufort Coast Guard Station in 1925. Intended to patrol for vessels bringing alcohol into the state, the boat could reach speeds of 25 miles per hour. As other vessels averaged between 8 and 12 miles per hour, the guardsmen were confident that the vessel could overtake all others on the water. Other additions to local infrastructure included ongoing construction of the Cape Lookout breakwater and expansion of the Norfolk southern railway to the Cape region.
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Record #:
34769
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Elmo Wade was a Carteret County boat builder working at the turn of the century. Growing up in a maritime community, Wade apprenticed as a shipbuilder, constructing both sailing and power boats. Beginning in the 1940s, Wade started constructing a fleet of boats for the local menhaden fishery. He soon expanded his business to include sportfishing vessels. Many of his customers received small models of spritsail skiffs as a thank you from Wade. Today, one of these models remains in the Smithsonian Museum’s maritime collection.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Fall-Spring 2008/2009, p10-13, il
Record #:
34766
Author(s):
Abstract:
The town of Beaufort, nestled on the Outer Banks, is the origins of the Inland waterway. This maritime route extends into the Neuse River, where it joins the Pamlico Sound. Traveling north, mariners can follow the Pamlico into the Albemarle and Chesapeake Bays. To move between Beaufort and Norfolk, Virginia, a system of canals linking the rivers and sounds was created. In 1925, canal expansion was underway to link the Alligator River and Cape Fear River into this inland waterway, bypassing the Pamlico Sound and the capes of the Outer Banks, respectively.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Fall-Spring 2008/2009, p3-5, il, map
Record #:
34765
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Abstract:
Between 1925 and 1931, two “chapel trains” operated by the Catholic Church in North Carolina traveled through the state proselytizing. The trains operated as literal Catholic churches on wheels, complete with pews, an altar, an organ, and a sanctuary. One of the trains stopped in Morehead City in 1926 and 1928. The priest on board, Father Egbert Albert, left a lasting impression on the town’s residents. Following his death, the Morehead City Catholic Church was built in his memory.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Fall-Spring 2008/2009, p1-2, il, por
Record #:
34770
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Abstract:
The last residents of Lukens Island left in the mid-1940s. The village itself has disappeared over the years, leaving the town cemetery as the last remaining evidence of the island’s past. Every year, former residents and family members gather on the island to visit and remember their loved ones. Today, the cemetery remains active as the final resting place for locals and past residents.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Fall-Spring 2008/2009, p14, il
Record #:
34772
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Abstract:
Sea Level, North Carolina, is home to the oldest retirement home in the United States, Sailor’s Snug Harbor. Created in 1801, the home was founded to care for aging and worn out sailors. In 1833, the facility was officially opened in Long Island, New York to care for retired merchant seamen. While the original property retained its historic value, residents required updated medical facilities which led to the search for a new facility. Sea Level was chosen, and in 1976, the home reopened in North Carolina. The facility’s maritime history remains part of the community; today, maritime art and nautical artifacts adorn the institution which is home to retired mariners and non-mariners alike.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 24 Issue 2, Fall-Spring 2008/2009, p15-17, il
Record #:
34771
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gunger, a molasses flavored cake, remains a Harkers Island tradition. The author, Ann Moore, attributes Gunger to Carteret County’s local history of maritime traditions. Early trade routes between the West Indies and North Carolina brought sugar products to the state, notably sugar and molasses. The recipe for Gunger is included in the article, recorded by the author’s grandmother.
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