NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for The Researcher Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
34729
Author(s):
Abstract:
In July, 1917, construction was completed on the breakwater at Cape Lookout. Measuring over two miles in length, the breakwater was built to create safe anchorage for vessels. The breakwater itself is approximately 50 feet in height and constructed from North Carolina granite. Nearby facilities include a Coast Guard Station. While the breakwater was being built, there were numerous other additions to local infrastructure including a new school house, an increase in farms and farm acreage, and creation of new Menhaden fish factories.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p14-15, il, por
Record #:
34730
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Outer Banks north of Cape Lookout boast the highest number of Coast Guard Stations—25 in total. The most dangerous stretches of coast are guarded by the Cape Lookout and Portsmouth stations. The town of Portsmouth is nestled at the northern end of Portsmouth island across the inlet from Ocracoke. Inhabited by 150 people during the early 20th century, the town contains a Coast Guard station, Methodist church, and village store. Residents keep sheep and chickens while wild ponies roam the island. Some of these are trained by Coast Guardsmen, who use them to patrol the beach during nightly watches.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p16-18, il, map
Record #:
34727
Abstract:
Captain Levi Tolson Oglesby, a Carteret County native, served as the county legislator for the state between 1854 and 1856. During his tenure, the government worked to establish free education for freed people in the state and suffrage for non-property owners. Oglesby supported both these endeavors, and championed increased infrastructure such as a rail line connecting Beaufort Harbor to the rest of the county. During the Civil War, Oglesby served as captain of the Carteret County militia.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p3-9, il, por
Record #:
34728
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article addresses the practice of hog killing as remembered by the author. An annual event that happened between Thanksgiving and early January, community members would gather to butcher and process hogs raised on local farms. The author discusses butchery practices and some of the recipes used by their family. Many of the cuts of meat required additional preservation including salting, drying, smoking, or canning.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p11-13, il
Record #:
34731
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author shares memories of growing up in Beaufort between 1921 and 1931. Born into a family with three siblings, the author recalls various establishments including the Courthouse, Methodist Church, family doctor, and railroad. The menhaden fisheries, too, left a lasting impression for the smell that would waft through town as fish were being processed.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Spring-Summer 2007, p19-21, il, por