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10 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000
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Record #:
4892
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following the South's defeat at Gettysburg, Raleigh newspaperman William Woods Holden urged negotiations with the North to bring peace. His peace movement put him at odds with many people, including his old friend Zebulon Vance, who defeated Holden for governor in 1864. North Carolina was the only state that had a peace movement. Confederate troops even sacked Holden's offices and threatened his life. After the war Holden became governor in 1868, but his support of African-American rights and opposition to the Ku Klux Klan led to his impeachment. He was removed from office in 1871, the first U.S. governor to endure this fate.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p24-27, il, por
Record #:
4890
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1862, Union troops occupied much of eastern North Carolina north of the Cape Fear River, and over 10,000 escaping slaves crossed their lines to freedom by spring. Many of the freed slaves joined the four North Carolina African American Union regiments. Others worked for the Army as teamsters, scouts, spies, cooks, and laundresses. When the war ended, the Freedman's Bureau replaced the Army as provider of care, welfare, and education to former slaves.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p15-17, il
Record #:
4891
Author(s):
Abstract:
Zebulon B. Vance was governor of North Carolina during the Civil War. He commanded the Twenty-sixth Regiment of North Carolina Troops at the battles of New Bern and Malvern Hill, prior to his election in 1862. He was an ardent nationalist and supported the Confederacy to the war's end. It was this steadfastness to the state that won him reelection in 1864 over peace candidate William W. Holden. Vance was again elected governor from 1877 to 1879 and then served as a U.S. Senator till his death in 1894.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p21-23, il
Record #:
4884
Author(s):
Abstract:
Quaker beliefs conflicted with those of the Confederate Government during the Civil War. Opposition to war, a belief in the equality of all peoples, and freeing their slaves was not acceptable to authorities. Hostility and harassment forced 10,000 Quakers to leave North Carolina. By war's end, only 2,000 Quakers remained in the state.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p36-37, il
Record #:
4881
Author(s):
Abstract:
Built in 1836 by the federal government, the Fayetteville Arsenal constructed and stored guns and ammunition, while providing jobs and bolstering the local economy. At the start of the Civil War, it came under Confederate control and was the South's second-largest domestic weapons source. When General Sherman captured Fayetteville in March 1865, he ordered the arsenal destroyed. Today the foundation stones of the arsenal are part of the Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex.
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Record #:
4893
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fort Fisher, built twenty miles south of Wilmington on the Cape Fear River at the start of the Civil War, was the largest and strongest earthwork fort in the world. As the Union blockade slowly closed all Southern ports, the fort was vital in keeping the river open to allow blockade runners to bring in supplies. Several times the Union tried top capture it and failed. On January 15, 1865, Fort Fisher finally fell to an overwhelming Northern force. Over 2,000 men were killed or wounded during the battle.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p28-31, il
Record #:
4883
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Confederate Prison at Salisbury was designed for 2,500, and the first Union POWs arrived in December 1861. Eventually the prison held 10,000. Food and clothing were scarce, and sanitary conditions were miserable. Things got worse as the war continued. Between four and five thousand Union soldiers died there. When Union General George Stoneman captured Salisbury in 1865, he ordered the prison burned.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p32-35, il
Record #:
4886
Author(s):
Abstract:
Life on the Southern home front was harsh for many families during the Civil War. With the men away, responsibility for keeping the farms going fell on the women, children, and elderly, since most North Carolinians did not own slaves. Marshall uses the family of Confederate soldier John Armsworthy to describe how the war destroyed the lives and dreams of many families.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p3-4, il, por
Record #:
4889
Author(s):
Abstract:
A number of Native Americans fought in the Civil War, some supporting the North, others the South. Several hundred Cherokees fought for the South, serving in Thomas' Legion, which was formed and led by William Holland Thomas. In the eastern part of the state, the Lumbees hid out in the swamps rather than do forced labor for the Confederacy. The Lumbees generally supported the North.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p11-12, il
Record #:
4882
Author(s):
Abstract:
Besides running businesses and farms while their men were in service during the Civil War, woman contributed to the cause in a number of other ways. They made uniforms, socks, tents, and leather goods. They also made company flags for the men from their hometowns. As the war progressed and materials were in short supply, women had to relearn old skills such as cloth weaving.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p13-14, il