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3 results for Salisbury Prison
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Record #:
4223
Author(s):
Abstract:
Established in November, 1861, the Confederate Salisbury Prison held as many as 10,000 captured Union troops in an area designed for 2,500. Food, clothing, and sanitary conditions were miserable and got worse as the war continued. Salisbury Prison was destroyed in April, 1865, by Union troops who liberated it. A recent symposium, held in Salisbury in July, 1988, brought together scholars, scientists, and descendants of prison guards and POWs.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 1, June 1999, p69-71, 73-74, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
20248
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is a reprint of letters written during the Civil War between David Olando McRaven and his wife Amanda Nantz McRaven. McRaven was a Mecklenburg County plantation owner and prisoners of war guard at Salisbury. The letters, written between July 4, 1864 and April 9, 1865, document this family's experience in the war and McRaven's experiences as a prison guard. Some biographical information about the McRavens and historical information on Salisbury prison is included.
Full Text:
Record #:
4883
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Confederate Prison at Salisbury was designed for 2,500, and the first Union POWs arrived in December 1861. Eventually the prison held 10,000. Food and clothing were scarce, and sanitary conditions were miserable. Things got worse as the war continued. Between four and five thousand Union soldiers died there. When Union General George Stoneman captured Salisbury in 1865, he ordered the prison burned.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 40 Issue 1, Fall 2000, p32-35, il