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12 results for Our State Vol. 82 Issue 11, April 2015
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Record #:
22568
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This article discusses the various exhibits at the Greensboro Science Center in Greensboro, North Carolina. Exhibits vary from aquatic animals, to dinosaurs, reptiles and even rare Asian swimming cats. The author also mentions the future plans of the center and upcoming science exhibits.
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22569
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This article is the conclusion to a four-year long series on the Civil War in North Carolina. The author discusses his experiences in researching and visiting various Civil War sites, in and out of North Carolina, and how his understanding of what North Carolina soldiers went through during the war has changed.
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22572
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This article details a tailor from Salisbury, North Carolina who specializes in making historically accurate military uniforms, from the American Revolution through World War II and other conflicts. The author discusses how he got his start, and how his attention to detail has made him a sought after source of information.
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Record #:
22570
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In this article, the author discusses the events that lead to the end of the Civil War, beyond the surrender of Lee's Army at Appomattox Courthouse. The author also discusses events that occurred after the surrender of the Confederacy, such as General Sherman being relieved of command and issues involving transportation of veterans from Virginia back to their homes.
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Record #:
22571
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This article details the story of an artifact hunter from Hillsborough, North Carolina named Joe Crews. The article details how Crews got his start in artifact hunting, and what kind of artifacts he has found, including a Civil War name tag belonging to the youngest man to ever enlist in the Union Army.
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Record #:
22774
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Today, the High Point Market is the largest home furnishing trade show in the world, but it was not always so prominent. This article highlights the history of the furniture industry and the evolution of the High Point Market into a successful affair.
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Record #:
22573
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Using a greenhouse of glass negatives, Harry Taylor presents glass-plate negatives of landscapes, historic sites, models and reenactors around Wilmington in a new exhibit, Requiem Glasshouse. Featured at Wilmington's Cameron Art Museum, Taylor's ambrotypes utilize nineteenth century methods to capture modern subjects in Civil War soul.
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Record #:
22575
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This article discusses the various types of seeds and how the era of small, independent seed stores are becoming a thing of the past. The author details differences in seeds, and how there is a special joy in growing a plant from seed rather than buying a pre-grown plant.
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Record #:
22574
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This article discusses blooming plants that the author enjoys. The author styles herself a \"yard person\" and discusses the different methods of upkeep required to maintain a healthy and blooming yard.
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Record #:
22576
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North Carolina's beer capital, Asheville, has a new brewing district: South Slope. Formerly the city's automotive center, South Slope is now home to a two block stretch of six breweries and a gourmet doughnut shop.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 82 Issue 11, April 2015, p162-166, 168, por Periodical Website
Record #:
22577
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Winston-Salem, North Carolina, long-known as a hub for the arts, is also stealing the show with numerous stage theaters, a nurturing arts council, and a nationally recognized film festival.
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Record #:
37642
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Clay was the stuff potsherds were made of, evidence for the lifeways of North Carolina inhabitants over the centuries. Places the author celebrated and commemorated included Fort Neoheroka, Town Creek, Soco Creek, and Seagrove.
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