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15 results for Our State Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014
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21585
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Mark Bannerman and his wife Mary Louise live in Columbus County on the farm that had belonged to his grandfather. For years he created his art while teaching art at Whiteville High School. Now retired, he is a full-time artist who practices what he preached to his students--\"to look at things differently.\" He finds treasures in candy wrappers, rain-gutter mesh, old buttons, bits of metals, and other tossed away materials and turns them into colleges which reflect life in Eastern North Carolina. Besides his colleges, he paints figurative works, portraits, and landscapes.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p28-29, il, por Periodical Website
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21586
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Standing in a quiet section on the edge of Durham, Five Oaks Clubhouse gives a living room appeal to the Forty Acres concerts held there on Saturday nights. The venue is small, seating just over one hundred, which gives the audience the opportunity to sit close to the stage and meet performers during breaks. Performers have come for decades, some known like Tiff Merritt or David Olney, others just beginning careers.
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21584
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Williams explores the life and works of naturalist, writer, and poet, George Ellison, who lives in Bryson City with his artist wife Elizabeth. In the summer they live in the Smoky Mountains National Park in a cabin sitting on fifty acres of forest, where, Ellison says, he draws great inspiration.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p23-27, il, por Periodical Website
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21587
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Statesville, the county seat of Iredell County, is Our State Magazine's featured Tar Heel Town of the Month. Among the places to visit are Carolina Bar-B-Q, First Flight Bicycles, Mitchell Community College, and the Statesville Historical Collection.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p34-36, 38, 40-41, il Periodical Website
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21605
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A building that stood on Main Street in Yanceyville had many reincarnations through the years--a Dodge dealership, a roller rink, barbecue restaurant, then just emptiness. In the 1990s John Willingham moved his apparel company, Indera Mills, to the city. He brought with him \"a love and appreciation for the arts.\" He purchased the old building as a gift for the Yadkin Arts Council and soon began a complete renovation. Cassady describes how the Yadkin Cultural Arts Center has blossomed.
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21606
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The Loray Mill in Gastonia was one of the largest textile mills in the country. In 1929, one of the most violent strikes ever erupted there, beginning a bitter struggle between textile factory owners and workers. Employees at the Loray Mill walked off the job when Fred Beal, who had been organizing a strike for more pay and a 40-hour week, was fired. Violence quickly broke out and in the ensuing weeks Police Chief W.O. Aderholt and strike leader Ella May Wiggins were killed. In the end, the union lost and the workers were blacklisted from working at local mills.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p42-44, 46, 48-51, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21610
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Describing five iconic cakes, Castle takes readers on a sweet trip from the mountains to the coast. Each tells a bit of the history of the region where it's prepared. They are the Dried Apple Stack Cake (Blue Ridge Mountains, Black Walnut Pound Cake with Old-Fashioned Penuche Frosting (Mountains and Foothills), Cheerwine Pound Cake (Piedmont), Muscadine Cake (Central NC, Sandhills, Coastal Plain, and Outer Banks), Fig Preserve Cake (Outer Banks).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p124-128, il Periodical Website
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21609
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The kitchens in this photographic essay are not the gleaming showplaces of the twenty-first century but instead are workplaces that are essential to the life of the home, whether it be an estate, regular village home, coastal lifesaving station, or a battleship. Among the kitchens pictured are Biltmore Estate, Carl Sandburg's home, the Winkler Bakery in Old Salem, Somerset Place, and the Battleship North Carolina.
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21608
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The North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame, which is housed in the North Carolina Museum of History, honors the state's most important sports figures. Crothers tours the hall with Hall of Fame member Bill Guthridge, the former basketball coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p58-60, 62, 64-65, il, por Periodical Website
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21611
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Villas, a James Beard Award-winning author, explains why the pound cake is held in such high esteem by North Carolinians. He recounts, when he was a child, listening to his mother's sacred ritual for the baking of the cake and also states that North Carolinians say they are going to bake a cake--there's only one type. He includes a pound cake recipe.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p139-132, 134, il Periodical Website
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21607
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Randy McCall and Worth Westbrook have operated McCall's Bar-B-Cue & Seafood in Goldsboro for the past twenty-five years. Quality bar-b-cue is done on a big scale at this restaurant. Nickens recounts how the men came to the bar-b-cue business and how the place operates.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p53-54, 56, il Periodical Website
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21623
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Piebird's, a restaurant located on Person Street in Raleigh, takes its name from the ceramic device that can be tucked into a pie to vent steam. Sheilagh Duncan opened her eating establishment in 2011, although regulars and others warned her that it would not succeed. However, its quirky appeal quickly caught on and soon became a fixture near the Mordecai and Oakwood neighborhoods. Lucas describes the restaurants offerings and operations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p102-104, 106, 108, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21625
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Nancie McDermott is a North Carolina cookbook author who wrote the book on Southern cakes and pies--appropriately titled Carolina Pies and the other one Carolina Cakes. She was born in Burlington, grew up in High Point, and acquired her love of cooking on her grandmother's farm outside Chapel Hill, and later graduated from The University. To date she has written eleven books.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p116-120, 122, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21624
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The sonker has mysterious origins, and each family's creation of it is different from others. What is this delicacy with the strange name? Most agree that it is a \"deep-dish pie, juicier than cobbler, and typically served in a rectangular baking dish.\" It is peculiar to Wilkes and Surry counties, and the sonker is celebrated in Mt. Airy with a Sonker Festival.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p110-112, 114-115, il Periodical Website
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21626
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Gerard recounts how soldiers deserting from North Carolina and other state regiments tried to survive while hiding out from Home Guards and other groups who sought them. Some were successful, some were not. A number escaped into Tennessee where they often enlisted in Northern units.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 9, Feb 2014, p142-149, il Periodical Website
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