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24 results for Our State Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006
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Record #:
8235
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Many of North Carolina's 8.6 million citizens have pets living in their homes. Several inns in the state recognize this unique connection between humans and animals. Jackson describes three inns where pets are welcome. They are The Red Dog Inn (Beaufort); Toad Alley Bed and Bagel (High Point); and the Blue Boar Inn (Robbinsville).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p160-162, 164, 166-167, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8240
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Ray Hicks was one of this country's best-loved storytellers and the famous teller of the Appalachian Jack Tales. He grew up in a remote section of the North Carolina mountains in Watauga County, where his family had lived for over two hundred years. Through the generations the family preserved the stories, songs, and folkways of their ancestors, along with stories of Jack and other fantastic happenings. Few of these storytellers ever ventured out from their communities until Ray Hicks came to the forefront as the leader of the storytelling revival that began in the 1970s. By 1985, he was known as the last traditional Jack Tale teller in North Carolina, and the Smithsonian honored him as a National Heritage Fellow.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p88-90, 92, 94, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8239
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In October 1995, photographer Kendall Messick and his friend Brenda Parker Hunt visited her hometown of Corapeake in Gates County to take some photographs of her relatives. What he discovered were faces and images he felt compelled to preserve on film. Over the next seven years he shot thousands of pictures of Corapeake's African American elders and spent countless hours recording their memories. The result was a documentary film, called \"Corapeake,\" that combines the recorded voices with the still images of the town's current and former residents.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p54-56, 58, 60, 62, 64, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8238
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In the 19th-century the United States Weather Bureau established several weather stations and observation posts throughout North Carolina and along the coast. The earliest coastal station was established in Wilmington in 1871, and has been in continuous operation since. A second station was built at Cape Hatteras in 1874, followed by five others up and down the coast. These stations played an important role in early storm and hurricane tracking and were the first weather warning systems for coastal residents. Harrison recounts the history of the Cape Hatteras Station.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p26-28, 30, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8245
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Mike and Ali Lubbock founded the Sylvan Heights Waterfowl Center in Scotland Neck in Halifax County in 1989. Covering about nine acres, the center boasts the largest collection of waterfowl in the world and is a conservation and research orientated center for birds, especially rare and endangered waterfowl. Sylvan Heights contains around 3,000 birds and 170 species, including 30 species that cannot be seen in any other collection or zoo in North America.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p32-34, 35-36, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8237
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Sylva, the county seat of Jackson County, was incorporated on March 9, 1889. It is a community where an impressive number of second- and third-generation merchants carry on businesses started by their forbears, together with new merchants who have helped to reinvigorate the downtown area. Places of interest for visitors include the City Lights Bookstore, Jackson's General Store, the Sylva Tree Walk, and Lulu's on Main.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p18-20, 22,, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8236
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There are over fifty mountains in North Carolina that reach heights of over 6,000 feet, making the state the home of the highest ranges on the East Coast. Hairr describes a number of them, including Great Balsam Mountains, Plott Balsam Mountains, Great Craggy Mountains. Unaka Mountains, Black Mountains, and the Great Smoky Mountains.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p42-44, 46, 48, 50, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8252
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Storyteller Connie Regan-Blake of Asheville maintains a busy schedule, performing nationally and internationally and conducting workshops to teach others the art of telling stories. A visit to her cousin, who was working in a library, started Regan-Blake on her storytelling career. In 1975, the two women decided to tell stories full-time, and for the next three years they performed around the country. They eventually settled in Asheville where Regan-Blake met her future husband. In July, the National Storytelling Network presented her with the 2006 Oracle Lifetime Achievement Award in recognition of her “sustained and exemplary contribution to storytelling in North America.”
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p97-98, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8249
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Roy Armstrong II came to Beaufort Community College in 1981 to teach English and to launch an oral history project. Students talked to people whose memories stretched back into an earlier time in coastal North Carolina and transcribed them. The result was a journal called LIFE ON THE PAMLICO. Thirty-eight issues have been published, each containing three or four oral histories illustrated with black-and-white photographs. The oral histories are available on the college website at CircaNCeast.beaufortccc.edu.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p136-138, 140, 142, 144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8254
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Storyteller Willa Bingham writes most of her stories and poems or adapts material from library books. She has been developing her storytelling style since 1990 and performs over 150 times a year. She is a familiar face around North Carolina because of her weekend television show, Smart Start Kids, which is shown on WRAL-TV and rebroadcast on UNC-TV. The show won an Emmy Award for best children's educational program in the Midsouth region.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p102-103, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8255
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Jerry Wolfe, an elder in the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, has spent many years storytelling and promoting Cherokee culture. His stories are drawn from his own experiences, including World War II and the Job Corps program, and from Cherokee animal tales. He is well-known as an expert on Indian stickball and as a carver of special sticks used in the game. He received the North Carolina Arts Council Heritage Award in 2003.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p104-105, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8250
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Swain County watercolorist Mary Elizabeth Moorefield Ellison uses paint, handmade paper, and her deep knowledge of the natural world to create images of the western North Carolina mountain world. She and her family have lived for thirty years in a forty-six acre cove that is bounded on three sides by the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Her paintings show the native plants and animals, tumbling streams, homesteads, and mountain landscapes of the North Carolina mountains.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p170-172, 174, 176, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8253
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Sheila Kay Adams grew up in Madison County in the small town of Sodom, a community famous for its ballad singers. She is a storyteller, writer, and seventh-generation singer. Her husband, Jim Taylor, builds dulcimers and arranges and produces music CDs of the old music. The couple spends about four months a year on the road performing the old songs and stories of the North Carolina mountains at storytelling festivals and concerts.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p100-101, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8251
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Hope Plantation, Bertie County's finest historic home, was built in 1803 by David Stone, who was governor from 1808 to 1810. In 1965, a group called the Historic Hope Foundation set out to save the abandoned house. By 1972, Hope Plantation had been restored, entered on the Register of Historic Places, and opened to the public. Visitors to the stately plantation can experience rural life in the northeastern part of the state as it was lived in the late 18- and early 19th-centuries.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p188-190, 192, 194, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8248
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North Carolina's yearly storytelling festivals attract large crowds who come to enjoy performances by some of the state's most talented voices. Blackburn describes some of them, including the Asheville Tellebration (Asheville); Toe River Festival (Spruce Pine); Catawba Valley Storytelling Festival (Newton); North Carolina Storytelling Guild Festival (Charlotte); North Carolina Storyfest (Greensboro); Wake County Storytelling Festival (Raleigh); Henderson Storytelling Festival (Henderson); Swansboro Festival (Swansboro); Manteo Ghost Story Festival (Manteo); and the Ocrafolk Festival (Ocracoke).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p126-128, 130, 132, 134, il, por Periodical Website
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