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13 results for Our State Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007
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Record #:
8763
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In 1880, when Richard Etheridge became the first African American in command of a life saving station, the Pea Island Life Saving Station on North Carolina's Outer Banks, the four white crewmen quit. Etheridge was free to choose a crew possessing the best qualities of a lifesaver. The crew was all African American, the first such in the history of the service. Led by Etheridge, the men earned a reputation for skill and courage in saving lives during a time of prejudice and racial tension, until the station was decommissioned in 1947. Harrison recounts the station's finest hour, the rescue of the captain, his family and crew, from the schooner E. S. Newman, on the night of October 11, 1896. One hundred years later, on March 5, 1996, Etheridge and his crew were posthumously awarded the Gold Lifesaving Medal, the service's highest peacetime honor.
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Record #:
8768
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Panthertown Valley, covering six thousand acres in Jackson, Macon, and Transylvania Counties in western North Carolina, is an ecological treasure with rare plants and animals. The valley was damaged by heavy logging in the 1920s, and in the 1960s, under great pressure from developers who wanted to turn it into a resort and vacation area. Duke Power purchased it in 1987 to build a high-voltage transmission line. In 1989, the North Carolina Chapter of the Nature Conservancy paid Duke Power $8 million for the 6,000-acre tract. Today, through preservation efforts, the valley has regained its wild beauty.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p106-108, 110, 112, 114-115, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8762
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Greenville, county seat of Pitt County, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. Originally named Martinsborough for the state's last royal governor, the city was moved to its present location on the Tar River in 1774 and renamed Greenville for Revolutionary War hero Gen. Nathaniel Greene. Greenville is home to East Carolina University and the East Carolina University School of Medicine. Cotton and tobacco drove the economy from the mid-19th century until these crops faltered in the late 20th-century. Today's major industries include DSM Pharmaceuticals, Harper Brush Works, Grady-White Boats, and ASMO, a maker of electric motors.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p20-22, 24-25, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
8764
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In this continuing series on the best walks to take in North Carolina, Setzer describes a walk among the towering trees of the mountains' primeval timberland, the Joyce Kilmer Memorial Forest. A two-mile, figure-eight loop takes walkers past some of the country's oldest and largest trees east of the Mississippi, 450-year-old poplars, some measuring twenty feet in circumference. The forest was dedicated in 1936 to the soldier-poet Joyce Kilmer, author of “Trees,” who was killed on July 30, 1918, near the close of World War I.
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8765
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At one time there were seventy gristmills operating in Wake County. Yates Mill, built around 1756, is the last one in existence. Jackson traces the ownership of the mill, which ceased operation in 1953. Although the mill was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1974, it seemed destined to follow the other sixty-nine into oblivion. Through the efforts of local preservationists the mills was restored and now stands as the centerpiece of the Historic Yates Mill County Park.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p78-80, 82, 84-85, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8766
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Two natural areas located in the Piedmont abound in natural beauty and are home to trees, plants, birds, and animals not commonly found outside the mountain regions. They exist because they formed along north-facing slopes that are cool and damp, similar to the environments found in the higher elevations of the mountains. Silcox-Jarrett describes the Occoneechee Mountain State Natural Area, located in Orange County, and the White Pines Nature Preserve, located in Chatham County.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p88-90, 92, 94-95, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8767
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Bertram Whittier Wells taught biology and ecology at North Carolina State University for thirty–five years. At age thirty-five, Wells was three years older than the university when he began working there in 1919. Since the botany department was in its infancy, he contributed significantly to its development. The Natural Gardens of North Carolina is one of his best-known works.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p98-100, 102-104, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8788
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The North Carolina Museum of Forestry, located in Whiteville, is a satellite museum of Raleigh's North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. The museum's mission is to showcase the vast forest diversity of the state. Established in 2000, the museum includes samples of native tree species, petrified wood, and remnants of the state's turpentine industry. Currently housed in the old Pioneer Savings and Loan building in Whiteville, work is proceeding in the development of a multi-million dollar, 40,000-square-foot, two-story facility complete with a living forest both indoors and outdoors.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p152-154, 156, 158, 160, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8786
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The extreme edge of the Eastern hemlock's southern range is the Appalachians. However, over 200 of these trees thrive in the Hemlock Bluffs Nature Preserve in Cary. Scientists believe this group of trees are naturally occurring remnants of the last glacial age. Discovered in 1971, the area is approximately three acres in size, and the temperature in the bluff area is about ten degrees lower than surrounding areas, a perfect temperature for hemlocks to grow. The preserve is now classified as a State Nature and Historic Preserve.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p172-174, 176, 178, 180-181, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8787
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There are two major threats to native plants in North Carolina. One is the habitat disruption that comes from construction and development. The second is nonnative plants, like kudzu and English ivy, which can dominate the habitats of the native species. Martin discusses the North Carolina Native Plant Society's work in protecting native plant species.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p144-146, 148, 150, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8785
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Charlotte has a unique assortment of gardens that bloom through each of the four seasons. Shirley describes one for each season: the Charlotte Museum of History and Hezekiah Alexander Homesite (spring); the McGill Rose Garden (summer); Elmwood Cemetery (fall); and the Susie Harwood Garden, UNCC Botanical Gardens (winter).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p118-120, 122, 124-125, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8789
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Jackson describes three avian-themed bed and breakfast accommodations that bird lovers, or anybody, can enjoy. They are the Robin's Nest Bed and Breakfast (Mount Holly); the Duck Inn Bed and Breakfast (Duck); and the Owl's Nest Inn and Engadine Cabins (Candler).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p196-198, 200, 202, 204, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8790
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Asheville Potter Karen Newgard transforms clay into elegant porcelain cups, bowls, pitchers, and platters. Newgard graduated from Louisiana State University with an art degree. Milling discusses technique and creations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p216-218, 20, 222, il Periodical Website
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