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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Endemic plants
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Record #:
7632
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Abstract:
Jackson describes three plants that are indigenous to North Carolina -- the bleeding heart, hearts a'bustin,' and forget-me-not.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 9, Feb 2006, p104-106, 108, 110, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8787
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There are two major threats to native plants in North Carolina. One is the habitat disruption that comes from construction and development. The second is nonnative plants, like kudzu and English ivy, which can dominate the habitats of the native species. Martin discusses the North Carolina Native Plant Society's work in protecting native plant species.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p144-146, 148, 150, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
26688
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Abstract:
The dwarf ginger is an endemic plant to North Carolina and is proposed for federal listing as a nationally endangered species. The Catawba County Wildlife Club has pledged to protect the dwarf ginger’s habitat along Jacob Fork River.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 32 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1985, p7
Record #:
10513
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina contains dozens of animals and plants that are found nowhere else. Among them are the Waccamaw Amnicola, Cape Fear shiner, and Carolina madtom.
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Record #:
38253
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cited as the third largest lake in North Carolina and home to endemic species, Lake Wacccamaw’s unique qualities include theories for its origins. Beliefs about the Carolina Bays’ creation range from the handiwork of meteors to the swimming patterns of its fish. As for the community surrounding the lake, Whiteville residents are also defined by the author as endemic. They thrive on small town values, such as tending to the town’s history and resisting a transformation into a tourist site.
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