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15 results for Our State Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006
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Record #:
7755
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Shelby, the county seat of Cleveland County, is OUR STATE magazine's featured Tar Heel town of the month. The town incorporated in 1843 and was named for Colonel Isaac Shelby, a Revolutionary War soldier. The town's current population is 20,000, and in 1980, it became one of the first places to be designated a national and North Carolina Main Street Community. The town supports historic preservation. Among the structures in the historic district are a 1919 Herschell-Spillman carousel, the 1907 Cleveland County Courthouse, the 1924 Masonic Temple, and the 1916 U.S. Post Office. Other attractions include the Shelby City Park, The Cleveland County Fair, and the Rogers Theatre.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p18-20, 22-23, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
7751
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In this second of a series of articles on classic Southern flavors, Garner discusses country ham. He describes several major ham producers and how they cure ham. Country ham curing is generally confined to the states of Virginia, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee. He lists several eating establishments that he feels serves the best country ham: Caro-Mi Dining Room (Tyron); The Jarrett House (Dillsboro); Miller's (Mocksville); and Pam's Farmhouse (Raleigh).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p36-40, 42-43, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7763
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Evangeline McLennan Davis was a woman who refused to be limited by the social conventions of her time. Born in 1914, Davis's early successes were in athletics. She earned a national tennis ranking and reached the quarter finals in what is now the U.S. Open. She later played golf and won the Southern Golf championship four times. In the 1930s and 1940s, she was a sportswriter. Many believe she was the first woman sportswriter in the country. In the late 1930s, an Atlanta paper sent her to report on the Far East, and she worked for a year in pre-war Japan. She married and settled in Greensboro with her journalist husband. They moved to Virginia in 1960, and she edited a weekly newspaper, The Virginia Gazette. Davis died in Raleigh in 2004.
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7764
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Most people whistle from time to time, but for Phyllis Heil of Hickory, whistling is a lifelong hobby. When she was four, one of her brothers gave her a whistling lesson, she has been perfecting her art ever since. She began performing publicly when someone overheard her whistling in the church basement. She has performed at funerals, hospitals, nursing homes, assisted living centers, and the church choir. In 2003, she took some classes at the International Whistlers Convention in Louisburg and watched the competitions. She returned in 2004 to compete and placed third in the women's division. In 2005, she again placed third in the women's grand championship and won the Entertainer of the Year Award. She has appeared on the Jay Leno Tonight Show and has recorded two CDs of her music.
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7765
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Snowbird Cherokees in western North Carolina chose a trail planted with trees and medicinal herbs to honor the memory of tribal leaders, like Junaluska, who have passed down age-old traditions. The Medicine Trail, which was completed in 2002, is located outside Robbinsville. The nearly seventy-five varieties of plants along the trail were selected for their role in the community's medicine traditions. Most of the plants along the trail are identified and their curative powers described. Plants include Joe Pye weed, sourwood, yellowroot, and goldenseal.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p90-92, 94, 96-97, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7769
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Jackson traces the early days of winemaking in North Carolina. Much of it can be traced back to what is called the Mother Vine, a strong grapevine that has survived four hundred years on Roanoke Island. Three scenarios are put forth for its beginning: the Indians cultivated it; it grew wild; or it was cultivated by the colonists of the Lost Colony. The vine is a scuppernong, a variety of muscadine grape. The vine was once over a half acre in size, but over the years decay, weather, insects, and diseases have reduced its size to about thirty feet wide and one hundred feet long. Life still exists in the vine, and the Duplin Winery was started with cuttings from the Mother Vine.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p82-84, 86, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7773
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During the Great Depression of the 1930s, the need for jobs was critical. Wilmington responded to the need by building the Community Drive, now known as Lake Shore Drive. This Depression-era project to build a five-mile road around Greenfield Lake and park in the downtown area created jobs for hundreds of men. Work began on November 24, 1930, and ended eighteen months later. The project funding was unique. Local residents who were fortunate enough to have retained their jobs agreed to fund the project through their own paychecks. Participants gave one day's salary every month. Over $110,000 was raised.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p116-120, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7771
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Mickey Walsh held the first Stoneybrook Steeplechase at his Southern Pine's farm in 1947. April 8, 2006, will mark the fifty-fifth running of the race, which attracts around 15,000 spectators and dozens of participants. The event was thought to be over in 1996, when the Walsh farm, the first and only home of the event, was sold for development. The race was revived a few years later at the Carolina Horse Park, located near Raeford in Hoke County. The race has been run there for the past six years. Morris discusses the history and pageantry of one of the Carolinas' largest horse-racing events.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p108-110, 112-113, il Periodical Website
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7770
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Throughout his life author Paul Green carried note cards in his pocket on which he would jot down words and phrases he remembered from his early years in Harnett County. The cards were filed and later became the basis of Paul Green's WORD BOOK: AN ALPHABET OF REMINISCENCE. From this his daughter Betsy Green Moyer, an expert photographer, has compiled the entries relating to flowers. Together with her co-editor, botanist Ken Moore, she has matched flower photographs with Green's comments. The result of the three-year project is Paul Green's PLANT BOOK: AN ALPHABET OF FLOWERS & FOLKLORE.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p100-102, 104, 106, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7782
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Kim Powell planned to retire in 2005 after thirty-plus years of service with Agricultural Extension and the Department of Horticultural Science at N.C. State University. Along with his teaching duties, he had been directly responsible for all Agricultural Extension professionals statewide. He had also hosted the UNC-TV show 'The Backyard Gardner' and a weekly call-in radio show on gardening. However, his retirement was delayed when he was asked to fill in as interim director of the J. C. Raulston Arboretum while a search was undertaken for a new director. The position was filled in December 2005.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p144-146, 148-149, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7784
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The Dovetail Garden, located in Charlotte's historic Fourth Ward neighborhood, is an eclectic garden, with roses, collard greens, tulips, and tomatoes growing side by side. The Fourth Ward is divided between residents of Edwin Towers, a Charlotte Housing Authority high-rise where low-income, mostly elderly and mostly African Americans live, and the affluent, mostly white residents who make up the rest of the ward's population. These two groups rarely interacted. Tomlin discusses how this unique 100-foot-wide circular garden brought a closer connection with people in the neighborhood.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p156-158, 160, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7783
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Photographer Carl Galie Headwaters began a three-year project in 1995 to photograph the section of the Roanoke River are in the southern Appalachian mountains of western Virginia to where the river descends to the North Carolina Piedmont and flows through several man-made reservoirs, including Kerr, Gaston, and Roanoke Rapids. His book, VISION QUEST, was published in 1998.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p150-152, 154-155, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7781
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Silcox-Jarrett traces the history of the Raleigh Rose Garden. Some sixty varieties of roses grow in the formal garden, with over one hundred throughout the entire garden.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p136-138, 140-141, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7785
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The Elizabeth II, modeled after the 16th-century sailing vessel that brought the colonists to Roanoke Island, brings early North Carolina history to life. It was constructed for the 400th anniversary of the first colonists' visits to Roanoke Island. Oesterreich describes how the ship was built and his experiences sailing aboard it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p164-166, 168, 170, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7786
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For the past five years, Desi's Dew Meadery, located in Rougemont and owned by Bill Bailey, has brewed a sweet-tasting alternative to wine. Mead is made from fermented honey and is thought to be the first alcoholic drink made by man, dating back over 5,000 years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p172-174, 176, il Periodical Website
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