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8 results for Our State Vol. 64 Issue 6, Nov 1996
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Record #:
3076
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A 31-foot-tall dogwood tree, discovered in Sampson County by A. J. Bullard of Mount Olive, has been declared the nation's tallest by the National Register of Big Trees. The dogwood has a circumference of 144 inches and crown spread of 48 feet.
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3084
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Hurricanes have been a threat to the state for centuries. In 1752, a powerful storm destroyed the town of Johnston, then the county seat of Onslow County, taking lives and property, and bringing government to a halt by scattering deeds and other documents.
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3083
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Around the world, over 20,000 individuals recreate the military lifestyle of the American Civil War with historical accuracy in dress and battles. Over 600 reenactors in 15 units in the state bring local history to life.
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3082
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Few individuals compile a career in politics like William Rufus Devane King's. Among his accomplishments were election to congress from North Carolina and Alabama and the U.S. vice presidency on two occasions. He served also as minister to France.
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3077
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Love Valley, located in Iredell County, is the result of one man's dream to build an Old West town. Started in 1954 by Andy Barker, the town features Western-style structures, rodeos, and many riding trails.
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3080
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Variety is the key word to describe the state's Christmas celebrations, which include light festivals, flotillas, and holiday tours of homes. Two of the largest are Asheville's Light Up Your Holidays and Winston-Salem's Tanglewood Festival of Light.
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Record #:
3081
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When sugar was scarce, too expensive, or rationed during wartime, many Carolinians made molasses for use as sweeteners. The Sapp family of the Concord/Rockwell area continues the tradition today.
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Record #:
3085
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For over thirty years, Floyd McEachern has collected material from the era of steam engines. Today his more than 3,000 items, including hand lanterns, train uniforms, and a caboose, are on display at the Historical Train Museum in Dillsboro.
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