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6 results for North Carolina Naturalist Vol. 23 Issue 1, Winter 2015
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Record #:
22596
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Since 1893, thirteen diamonds have been discovered in North Carolina as a result of gold or monazite panning. One such diamond found in Burke County, North Carolina resides in the Geology Collection of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. It was donated from the estate of J.A.D. Stephenson who discovered emeralds and hiddenite in Alexander County, North Carolina.
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Record #:
22595
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Alvin Braswell has retired after over forty years as curator of herpetology of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. Beginning his career in 1968, Braswell has mentored students and published comprehensive volumes on the reptiles and amphibians of North Carolina.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Winter 2015, p2-3, por
Record #:
35387
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Included in Rachel L. Smith’s companion article to “Comet Landing Makes History” was an article that offered new information about how planets form. What lent this new information was the discovery during the Rosetta Mission of HL Taurus, a protoplanetary system. Profiled also of Dr. Smith called “HL Tau” were the telescope used, the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), and H-Tau’s features, such as unusual oxygen chemistry.
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Record #:
35385
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According to Christina Stone, among the creatures inhabiting Museum’s Living Conservatory Exhibit, the most popular creature is one ironically also described as reclusive: Two Toed Sloth. Noted about the Two Toed Sloth were procedures performed during its yearly check-up and factors to account for when creating a safe habitat for this animal.
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Record #:
35388
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Human’s experience of our galaxy, in terms of extreme weather such as tornadoes and heavenly bodies such as stars, was featured in two of the articles part of this collection. Topics covered in the remaining trio were related to creatures inhabiting what lies below the heavens. One, by Lindsay Zanno, discussed how a bird’s skull lent a special sort of realism to a production of Anton Chekov’s The Seagull. Another revealed new morphological data issued from the study of a rare dinosaur, therizinosaur. The last was a dinosaur lecture series held at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, one of the lecturers being Dr. Mary Schweitzer.
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Record #:
35386
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Scientists landing on a comet will have implications beyond advancing the study of the solar system, according to the author. Included in Dr. Rachel L. Smith’s discussion of her study, led by the European Space Agency, were Philae, who lent humans a robotic hand in the crew’s discoveries, and findings from the Rosetta Mission.
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