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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 92 Issue 3, July 2015
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Record #:
24802
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Abstract:
In the summer of 1946, Franklin, North Carolina residents came together to save the sacred Cherokee “Mother Town” of Nikwasi, located in Franklin. History student, Nathaniel F. Holly agrues that although the Franklinites relied on their ideas of the “vanishing Indian” as support for their cause, ultimately, their efforts assisted with the disappearance of these Amerindians. However, the Cherokee Indians never disappeared from the Franklin area and their presence now forces Franklinites to consider the irony of this preservation effort.
Record #:
24804
Author(s):
Abstract:
Blackbeard is one of the most famous pirates in history, but much of his past is shrouded in mystery. History student and author, Baylus Brooks argues that contrary to popular belief, Blackbeard was not a ruthless pirate, but rather his actions were much milder than previously thought. He reveals new information about the identity of Blackbeard, his genealogical history, and his motivations for acts of piracy.
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Record #:
24803
Author(s):
Abstract:
Prisoner exchanges were a common part of military strategy during the Civil War. In 1864, Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant halted prisoner exchanges in an attempt to subdue the South, but in 1865, allowed prisoner transactions to resume. Wilmington, North Carolina was chosen as the site to release Union prisoners. History professor and author, Chris Fonvielle, addresses a number of questions about this exchange, including why Wilmington was chosen site and what the North Carolina public and political response was to the prisoner exchange.
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