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9 results for North Carolina Archaeology Vol. 51 Issue , Oct 2002
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Record #:
18606
Author(s):
Abstract:
Within the southern Piedmont of North Carolina are a number of streams and springs as well as a temperate climate. During the latter half of the 19th century there arose an interest in homeopathic medicine and related cures. Principal among these was healing spring and water treatments. Local entrepreneurs built a hotel/resort in western Gaston County to cater to an increasingly homeopathic and affluent local populace. Archaeological surveys have identified foundations associated with the resort, as well as artifacts.
Source:
North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 51 Issue , Oct 2002, p68-97, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
35116
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mary Fitts’ article covered the relationships facilitated between the American Indians groups residing in the Central Piedmont region between the sixteenth and first half of the eighteenth century. Highlighted were similar challenges the groups encountered. An examination of one of the groups inhabiting this region, the Catawba, involved factors such as their name’s possible origins, differences in class, social differences, and reasons for their becoming a confederacy of nations. With regards to their pottery, included were four tables and ten figures related to the locations and types. Their locations in this regions were revealed in three maps (see figures 2, 4, and 5), as well as locations for the archaeological expeditions (see figures 3 and 5).
Record #:
35406
Abstract:
This article is a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Riggs and Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.
Record #:
35405
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1982-2002, archaeological expeditions of the Southern Coastal Plains yielded explanations for unique cultural development patterns among inhabitants such as the Iroquois and Algonkian. Such patterns, referred to by Joel Gunn as a “cultural anvil,” were especially the case during prehistoric periods, as well as global and ice ages. The author explained that this phenomenon occurred because by the Coastal Plain’s lack of natural enclosures. The phenomenon was particularly observed in ceramic artifacts.
Record #:
35407
Author(s):
Abstract:
This was M.R. Harrington’s account of the discovery of Iroquois pottery surviving among the Eastern Cherokee, uncovered during his 1908-1909 expedition. Focused upon were the three principle forms of pottery characteristic of the Eastern Cherokee. Also discussed were three Eastern Cherokee women playing an active role in keeping the tradition alive, its production process, and similarities between Eastern Cherokee and New York Iroquois pottery.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35112
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1982-2002, archaeological expeditions of the Southern Coastal Plains yielded explanations for unique cultural development patterns among inhabitants such as the Iroquois and Algonkian. Such patterns, referred to by Joel Gunn as a “cultural anvil,” were especially the case during prehistoric periods, as well as global and ice ages. The author explained that this phenomenon occurred because by the Coastal Plain’s lack of natural enclosures. The phenomenon was particularly observed in ceramic artifacts.
Record #:
35113
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article was a lead in for “The Last of the Iroquois Potters,” M.R. Harrington’s 1909 study of traditional Cherokee ceramics produced during the Qualla periods in what is now Cherokee, NC. Brett Riggs and Christopher Rodning’s article focused on other archaeologists from Harrington’s time and characteristic features of pottery produced particularly during the Qualla periods. Also noted were other discoveries of Iroquois pottery in Southeast regions such as Georgia and the continuation of this pottery’s production into the twenty first century.
Record #:
35115
Abstract:
In the past few decades, archaeological expeditions of the Inner Coastal Plain of the South Atlantic Slope have justified the development of a new soil phosphate analysis to determine soil site integrity. Noted by the authors were reasons for the importance of this innovative soil analysis, such as its dependability as a chemical indicator of past human activity.
Record #:
35114
Author(s):
Abstract:
This was M.R. Harrington’s account of the discovery of Iroquois pottery surviving among the Eastern Cherokee, uncovered during his 1908-1909 expedition. Focused upon were the three principle forms of pottery characteristic of the Eastern Cherokee. Also discussed were three Eastern Cherokee women playing an active role in keeping the tradition alive, its production process, and similarities between Eastern Cherokee and New York Iroquois pottery.