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7 results for New East Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975
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Record #:
5967
Author(s):
Abstract:
Zachery Taylor Koonce is a Beaufort County poet who \"turns the legends and lore of his tidewater homeland into brilliant new verse.\" Williams discusses Koonce's life and poetry. Examples of the poet's work, such as \"Roanoke's White Deer\" and \"On Old Tobacco Barns,\" are included in the article.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p8-11, il, por
Record #:
35512
Abstract:
Treasures found in Williamsburg and Charleston were expected. What was a pleasant surprise to A.G.L. Hellyer, a horticultural journalist mentioned by the author, was the Orton Plantation, which Wakefield boasted as offering the most beautiful garden in North Carolina. How the lower Cape Fear area and its people contributed to its creation, this was disclosed in the discussion of Brunswick County’s development, pre and post-Colonial days.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p27-29
Record #:
35511
Author(s):
Abstract:
In noting how mules have been an invaluable and longtime source of labor, the author proved they has earned a rightful place in history, whether on the plantation or family farm, whether in the US South or Biblical Middle East. Going further in proving the hybrid creature’s value, Jones provided information that refuted common myths (for example, only males are sterile) and ways to keep this “historically industrious” animal healthy.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p22-25
Subject(s):
Record #:
35509
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than the end of a man’s life happened on November 22, 1718, according to the author. With the death of Edward Teach, better known as Blackbeard, the golden age of piracy in the New World effectively came to an end. Highlighted in this chronicle were people who played an instrumental role, notably Governor Spotswood of Virginia, and the events from June through November that led to the end for this famous pirate.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p13-15
Record #:
35510
Abstract:
How historic Bath earned its title as a national historic district: by being the colonial capital and the first incorporated town in the state. This small town, made up of 231 denizens, earned its popularity through shops such as The Tu Da Shoppe and Pirate’s Treasure. Playing a greater role, though, was many and varied displays of southern hospitality.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p19-21
Record #:
35513
Author(s):
Abstract:
What makes the fisherman go to the dock, time and again, despite seemingly endless amounts of time waiting, the rigors of the wind whipping and heat of the sun baking? The reason the author revealed, anyone dedicated to this sport would well understand. The moment the King Mackerel is reeled in makes everything and every minute it took to capture the fish worth the effort.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p31-32, 35
Record #:
35514
Author(s):
Abstract:
Understanding this Whiteville lifelong resident entailed revealing details such as his early attempt to follow in his father’s footsteps, WWII service, graduation from Duke, civic contributions, home life with his family. The best way to understand Lawrence Bowers, though, seemed to lie in understanding his passion for the career he chose over bridge building: banking.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p36-37