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5 results for Fishing communities--Carteret County
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Record #:
3088
Author(s):
Abstract:
Across Jarrett Bay from Williston in Carteret County lies Davis Ridge, a fishing community founded by liberated slaves in 1865 and destroyed by a hurricane in 1933. The self-sufficient town enjoyed a unique, close relationship with its white neighbors.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Sept/Oct 1996, p18-19, il Periodical Website
Record #:
13898
Abstract:
Vandemere, the Seafood Town, was almost down and out until 1945, when this Pamlico fishing community decided to be something.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 5, July 1950, p8-9, map, f
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Record #:
15826
Author(s):
Abstract:
A recent Sea Grant publication by Jim Sabella and Marcus Hepburn helps agencies regulating the State's fisheries to know something about the people and communities they are regulating--their values, their history, and their culture, which includes areas like Harkers Island with rich old fishing and boat-building traditions.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Fall 1980, p41-43, f
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Record #:
19631
Abstract:
North Carolina's Outer Banks is often the location of conflict between commercial fishermen and the combined forces of sport fishermen, conservationists, and environmentalists over the marine fisheries of the region. In this interview with North Carolina Marine Fisheries Commission member Barbara Garrity-Blake and Susan West, a member of the North Carolina Joint Commission on Seafood and Aquaculture, they discuss the conflict and the coastal Carolinians who are involved. Together they authored a book, Fish House Opera, a work of non-fiction that delves into the struggle and how North Carolina's fishing communities deal with and adapt to it.
Source:
Record #:
35513
Author(s):
Abstract:
What makes the fisherman go to the dock, time and again, despite seemingly endless amounts of time waiting, the rigors of the wind whipping and heat of the sun baking? The reason the author revealed, anyone dedicated to this sport would well understand. The moment the King Mackerel is reeled in makes everything and every minute it took to capture the fish worth the effort.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 5, Nov/Dec 1975, p31-32, 35