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5 results for Carolina Country Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1971
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Record #:
32169
Author(s):
Abstract:
Opossums are serving as powerful biomedical tools in studies being conducted by Dr. William Jurgelsky at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, near Raleigh. The newborn opossum is much like a two-month old human fetus in its ability to serve as a unique animal model for testing the effect of suspected toxins on infant development. This article discusses Jurgelsky’s experiments and discoveries in fetal development.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1971, p20-21, il, por
Record #:
32167
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite advertising claims made by oil companies, all gasoline brands sold in North Carolina must meet state standards. North Carolina is one of only eleven states which has fixed minimum standards for gasoline. The North Carolina Agriculture Department’s Gasoline and Oil Division ensures that these standards are met, to protect the consumer and legitimate businessman from financial loss and danger.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1971, p10-11, il
Record #:
32166
Author(s):
Abstract:
Grady Fowler and Ben Venable of Surry County came up with an idea for an automatic egg gathering system. Their invention, called the Fowler Venable System, consists of nesting units which constitute the conveyor, the conveyor drive, and a vacuum system which cleans the conveyor after each cycle. The new system is being tested by various poultry companies, and is expected to drastically improve efficiency and work operations.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1971, p8-9, il
Record #:
32168
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rural towns like Kenly in Johnston County now have water and sewage systems thanks to financial assistance from the Farmers Home Administration (FmHA). This article discusses the FmHA and highlights improvements to rural North Carolina communities.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1971, p16-17, il
Record #:
32165
Abstract:
This is a nostalgic essay about old Eastern North Carolina barns and how these structures represent the original rural culture in the South. Anecdotes and photographs depict the function and value of barns in historic rural life.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1971, p6-7, il