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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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136 results for "North Carolina's Eastern Living Magazine"
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Record #:
24860
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Abstract:
In addition to a list of the state parks in North Carolina, this article focuses on three parks within Eastern Living Magazine the ten county coverage of the magazine: Goose Creek State Park, Medoc Mountain State Park, and Pettigrew State Park.
Record #:
38134
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This museum in Tarboro, opened in 2004, is more than a way to honor Edgecombe veterans from wars spanning the American Revolution to Middle East conflicts. It offers a way of life across the centuries and all military branches. Its 30,000 plus gems include bayonets, Civil War battle flags, a restored WWII jeep, samurai swords, Nazi helmets, and 1,000 photographs.
Record #:
34394
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Two Hyde County residents, Gloria Jennette and Bertha Spencer, highly regarded genealogists and historians, have each spent over twenty years researching their families. Using a variety of records including slave records, they have been able to trace some of their ancestors to the mid to late 1700s and early 1800s. Between the two of them, they possess a mixture of surnames of men and women who lived in various communities throughout Hyde County such as Middleton, White Plains, Nebraska, Slocum, Mount Pleasant and Piney Woods.
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Record #:
23289
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Abstract:
The Cashie River in Bertie County is historically significant to the small town of Windsor, which is the reason it sits in its present location.
Record #:
23836
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The Brady C. Jefcoat Museum in Murfreesboro, North Carolina displays the collection of Brady Jefcoat. There are more than 16,000 items in the collection, some dating back to the Great Depression. Most of the artifacts are old household items like washing machines, radios, and plumbing hardware.
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Record #:
16760
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Abstract:
When Hurricane Isabel blew the water out of the Cashie River in Bertie County in 2003, the remains of a large wooden ship were visible. Photographs were sent to the Underwater Archaeology Department at East Carolina University and researchers spent two seasons working on the wreck in 2009 and 2010. Fueston describes some of their findings.
Record #:
23303
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AF Wake in Lake Gaston is a camp that teaches people of all ages how to wake board, wake surf, and wake skate
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Record #:
38138
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Traditions associated with Christmas, German immigrant style, are still part of the Yuletide season for many North Carolinians. Traditions traced back to German immigrants also with a religious base include the Moravians’ Putz, a nativity related decoration, and Lebkuchen, a cookie. A holiday tradition with a somewhat dubious origin was the Christmas tree, this decoration possibly brought in by Hessian soldiers during the Revolutionary War.
Record #:
23838
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Abstract:
In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, eastern North Carolinians established fisheries along the Roanoke River. Just before the Civil War, W. H. Hampton opened a large fishery just north of Plymouth and the business remained in the family until it closed in 1937.
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Record #:
38118
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The small-town persona of the past included Main Street as the main street and Bijou Theatre. For Columbia, the cinema on the corner of Main and Elm Streets provided a major source of entertainment and helped define the way of life in the small town. Seven days a week, three times a day, and for nearly fifty years, the Columbia Theatre became a landmark in the community and backdrop for many locals on life’s stage.
Record #:
38119
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Abstract:
From the mystique built up around Blackbeard the past three centuries, the scant details that can be defined as truth have been coated with generous layers of fiction. Defining his life and death as more a series of questions than statements are speculations such as the location of his treasure and real name. Counted as closer to the truth by historical interpreters and members of the North Carolina Historical Society are Blackbeard’s ties with Bath and Colonial administrative officials. Contributing also to truth’s pursuit are the Blackbeard Jamboree. This festival includes activities such as seafaring and tavern songs and camps that reflect 17th and 18th-century maritime lifeways.
Record #:
24850
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Abstract:
Skip and Sandy Abrams own Magnolia House Honey in Jackson, North Carolina. They started the business in the fall of 2014 and have had huge success. Their honey ranges in color and includes varieties from New York, Florida, and North Carolina. They discuss the struggles of beekeeping and where different forms of honey come from.
Record #:
21776
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Abstract:
The origin of the Albemarle's bell is unknown, although speculations are that it came from a church or school. After the war, it wound up in Worcester, Massachusetts in the possession of a Union chaplain. After his death it passed through a number of hands, and at one time it was in storage for forty years at the Worcester History Museum. The bell is now on loan to the Port O'Plymouth Museum and will be a focal point in the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Plymouth.
Record #:
34382
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Commercial fishermen have been an integral part of Hyde County’s heritage and economy. David Gibbs, a third-generation commercial fisherman, has spent the last twenty-five years crabbing, fishing, shrimping, and oystering. As Gibbs explains, with different kinds of fishing the work varies from day to day.
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Record #:
24862
Abstract:
As part of its spring arts festival, Tarboro will be hosting an April performance and ten-day workshop by the New York Theatre Ballet. Events will also include a memorial exhibition in honor of Edgecombe native Hobson Pittman. Pitman was renowned for paintings evoking the South. The festival will conclude with a Gala will be held on April 30.