NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


1246 results for "North Carolina Historical Review"
Currently viewing results 16 - 30
Previous
PAGE OF 84
Next
Record #:
21824
Author(s):
Abstract:
A look at the hillbilly songs of Dave McCarn, a Gastonia, textile mill worker, who wrote about the realities of life for Southern mill workers in the 1920s-30s. McCarn's best-known recording, \"Cotton Mill Colic,\" and its two sequels, criticized the Southern textile industry for failing to pay workers a living wage.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
21473
Author(s):
Abstract:
An examination of the practice of looting and plundering stranded vessels, called \"wrecking,\" via the investigation of three incents between 1698 and 1750 on the Outer Banks, to provide insight into the behavior of the colonists who exploited the accidents as well as the attitudes and capacities of the governing authorities charged with upholding royal laws, maintaining order, and punishing lawbreakers.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
21360
Author(s):
Abstract:
A look at the military career of Confederate Brigadier General Gabriel J. Rains as related to his expertise with land mines and \"subterra shells,\" and eventually his experimentation with and development of the use of marine mines while serving as the head of the newly created Torpedo Bureau.
Record #:
21640
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two 1894 court cases, Charles H. Martin (Populist) v. James A. Lockhart (Democrat) and Cyrus Thompson (Populist) v. John G. Shaw (Democrat) are examined in order to shed light on the appeal of populism as a movement of social and political protest among farmers and the lower classes.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
21403
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first of three articles published under the heading \"A Forum: The Virginia-North Carolina Slave Conspiracy of 1802.\" This article examines the 1802 plot by slave rivermen to rebel against white slaveholders, positing that the conspiracy originated in Halifax County, Virginia, and spread to other Virginia and North Carolina counties.
Record #:
21537
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article compares letters and diaries of four wealthy women of elite society in Caldwell County, Ella Harper, Till Abernathy, Laura Norwood, and Mary Fries Patterson, to determine how the combination of a common geographical location mostly spared of direct contact with military invasion and civil unrest, wealth, and a support network based on prewar affiliations among females of their social class enabled these women to cope more effectively with wartime hardships than other women of the Piedmont and mountains of North Carolina.
Source:
Record #:
21448
Abstract:
A look at the character and psychology of antebellum white laborer Edward Isham and the circumstances that surrounded the brutal murder of yeoman farmer James Cornelius by Isham, as well as Isham's resulting trial. Interpretation of the events is used to extrapolate general ideas about poor and powerless white southerners in the antebellum period.
Source:
Record #:
22715
Author(s):
Abstract:
The East End/Valley Street neighborhood and the Nasty Branch Creek fostered a collective identity for the black public in Asheville, North Carolina in the 1950s-1970s. In the face of urban renewal, this neighborhood and surrounding environment provided economic opportunities and social networks.
Source:
Record #:
21147
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is a reprint of letters written by Washington Wills, a slave to the Wills family of Brinkleyville, North Carolina. The letters were written to Richard Wills in 1864 informing him of the death of his younger brother George Whitaker Wills. The two letters are noted for their emotional and heartfelt content. Biographical information on George, Washington, and the Wills family is also provided.
Record #:
22700
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the context of the Regulator Uprising, no other person is more lionized that James Pugh. Pugh gained legendary status for his role as sharpshooter during the 1771 skirmish with Gov. William Tryon's militia forces at the Battle of Alamance. The rest of the Pugh family is also known to have been part of the legendary Regulators.
Source:
Record #:
21810
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article looks at the participation of Fentress County, Tennessee resident Alvin C. York in World War I with a particular emphasis the characterization of York in the Film \"Sargent York\" and its accuracy concerning both York himself, as well as Western North Carolina soldiers involved in the conflict.
Record #:
21440
Abstract:
This article examines the feminist movement of the 1920s, specifically the decline of feminism during the decade, first via the historiography of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s, and then through the ideas, values, and ideology that informed the range of women's activities in a changing social and political context, with the North Carolina League of Women Voters serving as a case study.
Source:
Record #:
34447
Author(s):
Abstract:
On 7 December, 1862, Presbyterian pastor Robert J. Graves was arrested for treason against the Confederacy. Over the next year, the case gained popularity in the media as it polarized public opinion of constitutional rights under the Confederate government. This article discusses the circumstances behind Graves’ arrest and subsequent trial.
Full Text:
Record #:
21571
Abstract:
A look at the Civil War career of Confederate major general William Dorsey Pender, in an attempt to provide new insight into the Army of Northern Virginia and one of its most important young leaders. Pender's role in several battles as well as relationships with fellow officers, the personal and state politics that complicated his promotion process, and the beliefs, opinions, and experiences of a leader who expressively proclaimed attitudes shared by many other Southerners in his position are examined.
Source:
Record #:
21442
Abstract:
A look at the design and construction of the neoclassical style mansion at Hayes plantation near Edenton, which comes from a unique blend of architectural traditions and changing building practices, from established regional traditions, and from emerging national and international trends.
Source: