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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Women
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Record #:
26063
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Associate professor of Asian Studies, Jan Bardsley, studied how Japanese women perceived the American woman during the 1940s and 1950s. Magazines used exaggerated images of the American woman to convince Japanese women that democracy would improve their lives. Images of stylishly dressed women encouraged Japanese readers to follow Western lifestyles.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 18 Issue 1, Fall 2001, p20-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
15272
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Elizabeth (Mickey) Warren of Monroe was the first woman elected to class officer at the University of North Carolina. She defeated George Ralston of Harrisonburg, Pennsylvania by a final count of 246 to 182 to become the senior class secretary. Though no official statement disallowed women from becoming class officers, and many women ran for positions, but an undercurrent of topical sexism kept men in office with the opinion that these honors were reserved for \"Carolina gentlemen.\"
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 49, May 1939, p3, por
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Record #:
4220
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Over the years a number of New Bern women have had an impact on the town, state, and nation. Emeline Pigott spied for the South during the Union occupation. Bayard Wootten became one of the 20th-century's most outstanding photographers. Charlotte Rhone was the state's first black registered nurse. Minnette Chapman Duffy organized the New Bern Historical Society in 1923.
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Record #:
22733
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Sport shooting is a growth industry among women in Fayetteville, North Carolina.
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Record #:
24904
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After losing her husband in 2009, Elizabeth Berrien joined a widow’s support group to help her get her life back together. Wanting to do the same for others, she started Soul Widows, a non-profit organization that takes care of grieving women.
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Record #:
22298
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Several North Carolina women who played parts in various phases of the Revolutionary War including Betsy Dowdy, Mary Slocumb, and Flora MacDonald.
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Record #:
24583
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This article presents a group of women who worked to create and publish an independent and unsubsidized weekly newspaper in North Carolina, which they named the ‘Leader.’
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 12, November 1971, p11-12, il
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Record #:
22730
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Five housewives from Fayetteville, North Carolina relate how they have managed the varying demands of their lives and careers, without all the drama. From professional careers and businesses , to charities and military bases, they have had considerable impact on our community.
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Record #:
2712
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Mules stolen from the Union army began Ashley Horne's fortune. In 1911, frustrated by the lack of legislative funding to honor Confederate women, the Confederate veteran paid $10,000 to build a monument to Confederate women on Capitol Square in Raleigh.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 55 Issue 8, Jan 1988, p12-14, il, por
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Record #:
15273
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The Women's Division of the Democratic National Committee met on May 23rd and 24th 1939 in Winston-Salem to promote Democratic success in the 1940 elections. Women from eleven states registered to join and the state encouraged its Democratic women to join in force, urging each county to send five delegates a piece. Events planned included many prominent female speakers and a banquet for further interaction.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 51, May 1939, p7, il
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Record #:
36543
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Women have been included in anthropological studies of serpent-handling, but no past research has focused specifically and solely on the experiences of the women who practice this tradition, nor has it been collected by a female researcher. Interviews with the women demonstrate that experiences, actual roles in church life, and accounts will vary from person to person, from church to church, and from state to state.