NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Quiltmakers
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
22769
Author(s):
Abstract:
In addition to statues and stone monuments, hand-made quilts can commemorate specific events and people, or serve as memorials to honor the dead. North Carolina women have made quilts throughout history to memorialize particular individuals or events, including the 1976 \"Historical Landmarks of Wake County\" quilt, which was created to celebrate the National Bicentennial.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 54 Issue 1, Fall 2014, p32-33, il
Record #:
29803
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Western North Carolina Quilters Guild will host a two-day juried quilt show in Flat Rock this May. The show will display over one-hundred quilts from across the mountain region, and teach visitors about quilt styles and quilting techniques.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
31374
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jane Long of Cary has won the blue ribbon for best quilt in the show at the North Carolina State Fair for the fourth year in a row. Her latest winning entry, an original design, shows an Amish influence, with quilting done in black thread. This article discusses Long’s quilting techniques, patterns, and materials.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
36022
Abstract:
A library’s archives typically contain donations of letters and documents. For Hatteras Island’s Library, a 125 year old quilt reflected what the town’s culture perceived as preservation worthy. Current creators of these quilts, in discussing the tradition of quilt-making, also proved that the “Human Library” concept is not so new.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p20-21
Record #:
36380
Abstract:
Different patterns on quilts made by African Americans used to be a form of communication in the Underground Railroad. Ten to twelve different patterns were used to inform fugitive slaves as to what their next action should be. Although quilting patterns are no longer used for these purposes, patterns are still very important within African American quilting communities.